Skip to content

    Asthma Health Center

    Select An Article

    Keeping an Asthma Diary

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    By monitoring the severity of your asthma symptoms using a peak flow meter and practicing self-management using peak flow zones, you can live an active life free of asthma symptoms.

    Another component of this self-management is an asthma diary. Keeping a daily asthma diary can help you monitor asthma triggers and asthma medications. The asthma diary is used to:

    Recommended Related to Asthma

    Spring Asthma

    Spring. After a long, cold winter, most of us look forward to rising temperatures and blooming plants. But if you have asthma, allergies, or both (as about 50% of people with asthma do), the pollen that comes with the season can take a toll. Pollen allergies can trigger your asthma. “Seasonal pollens in the spring can result in airway inflammation and worsen underlying asthma,” says Joyce Rabbat, MD, an assistant professor at Loyola Medicine. “We see a large jump in asthma-related emergency...

    Read the Spring Asthma article > >

    Recording this information will help you recognize asthma attacks and head them off before you become seriously ill. Your doctor will also use this diary to evaluate how well your asthma action plan is working.

    How Do I Keep a Daily Asthma Diary?

    To keep a daily asthma diary, start by printing out a copy of an asthma action plan. We have a blank asthma action plan in this guide.

    Next, determine and record your asthma zones. Place this information in your asthma diary so you can refer to it easily.

    Each day:

    • Fill in the date.
    • Measure PEFs using a peak flow meter, and record the readings in your diary. Be sure to measure PEF before taking your daily asthma medications.
    • Compare your PEF readings to your asthma zones.
    • If the highest PEF reading is less than 80% of your personal best, you must follow the instructions given by your health care provider in your asthma action plan. Also remember to check PEFs more frequently that day, including an evening PEF.
    • Fill in the total number of puffs of the short-acting beta 2-agonist (your rescue or quick-acting inhaler) used over the past 24 hours.
    • Rate any asthma symptoms you had during the day.

    Remember to take the asthma diary to each doctor visit so your doctor can assess how well your asthma treatment plan is working.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 28, 2016
    Next Article:

    When Is Your Asthma Worse?

    When Is Your Asthma Worse?

    Take the WebMD Asthma assessment to get Personalized Action Plan

    Start Now

    Today on WebMD

    Lung and bronchial tube graphic
    5 common triggers.
    group jogging in park
    Should you avoid fitness activities?
     
    asthma inhaler
    Learn about your options.
    man feeling faint
    What’s the difference?
     
    Madison Wisconsin Capitol
    Slideshow
    woman wearing cpap mask
    Article
     
    red wine pouring into glass
    Slideshow
    Woman holding inhaler
    Quiz
     
    Man outdoors coughing
    Article
    Lung and bronchial tube graphic
    Article
     
    10 Worst Asthma Cities
    Slideshow
    runner
    Article