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Understanding Wheezing -- Diagnosis & Treatment

How Do I Find Out the Cause of My Wheezing?

To determine the cause of your wheezing, your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and what triggers them. For example, if you have no history of lung disease and you always wheeze after eating a certain food or at a certain time of year, the doctor may suspect that you have a food or respiratory allergy.

The doctor will listen to your lungs with a stethoscope to hear where the wheezing is and how much wheezing you have.

Recommended Related to Asthma

Can Kids Outgrow Asthma?

The wheezing, the shortness of breath. Will it ever end? Sometimes young children have asthma-like symptoms that disappear. What they have isn't asthma. It’s a temporary condition that doesn’t turn into the lung disease, says Joyce C. Rabbat, MD. She's an assistant professor at Loyola University Medical Center’s Division of Allergy and Immunology. The wheezing is treated just like asthma, but it goes away by itself, usually by age 5 or 6. Most kids who have symptoms like wheezing and shortness...

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If this is the first time you've been evaluated, your doctor will probably ask you to perform a breathing test (spirometry) and may also order a chest X-ray.

Other blood tests and procedures may be necessary, depending on what the doctor learns from interviewing and examining you.

If it seems like allergies may be related to your wheezing, there are a variety of other tests your doctor may use to verify allergies, including skin testing or blood tests.

What Are the Treatments for Wheezing?

First off, see a doctor to determine the cause of your wheezing and then receive treatment for the specific cause.

If wheezing is caused by asthma, your doctor may recommend some or all of the following to reduce inflammation and open the airways:

If you have acute bronchitis, your doctor may recommend some or all of the following:

  • A bronchodilator -- albuterol (Proventil HFA, Ventolin HFA), levalbuterol, (Xopenex) -- to help ease the wheezing as the infection clears.
  • An antibiotic is usually not needed unless you have an underlying chronic lung problem or your doctor suspects a bacterial infection may be present.

Generally, any mild wheezing that accompanies acute bronchitis disappears when the infection does.

Call 911 if you have any difficulty breathing. In emergencies, a medical team may administer any of the following:

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Luqman Seidu, MD on February 28, 2015

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