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Can You Guess Your Baby's Sex?

Trying to tell whether it's a boy or girl? Here's what works -- and what doesn't.

Pregnancy Myth #6: Sick to Your Stomach

Myth: If you have morning sickness all day, it's a girl.

Reality: This myth might have some truth to it. Studies have found that women with a severe form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum are more likely to give birth to girls. 

The reason? Levels of the pregnancy hormone hCG, which triggers morning sickness, tend to be higher in mothers who are pregnant with female babies. 

But a pregnant woman can certainly have morning sickness, even bad morning sickness, when she's carrying a boy. So no, you can't count on it being a girl if you've got serious morning sickness.  

Pregnancy Myth #7: Look at the Calendar

Myth: The Chinese Lunar Calendar can predict a baby's gender based on the mother's age when she conceived, and the month of conception.

Reality: The Chinese Lunar Calendar was discovered in a 700-year-old Royal tomb, and many pregnant women who've used it swear by it. Could this ancient artifact have some modern science behind it? Not necessarily. According to the same Canadian researchers who did the Drano test, the Lunar Calendar is no more accurate at predicting a baby's gender (50/50) than a random guess.

Learning Your Baby's Gender, For Real

One accurate way to predict whether you're having a boy or girl is to have an ultrasound, which is usually done between weeks 18-20 of pregnancy. Provided that your ultrasound technician gets a good view between your baby's legs, the imaging procedure should be able to tell you with about 80% to 90% accuracy whether you'll need to paint the nursery pink or blue.

Amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS) also can determine your baby's sex with a high degree of accuracy, but these more invasive tests are usually reserved for situations in which the baby may have a genetic disorder or chromosomal abnormality, such as Down syndrome.

DNA tests of the mother's blood can also accurately detect the baby's sex, but because of their high cost, these tests are only used in specialized laboratories, not commercially.

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Reviewed on May 21, 2010

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