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Treat Gestational Diabetes for Baby's Sake

Study Shows Treatment of Diabetes in Pregnant Women Cuts Health Risks for Infants

Advantages of Treatment of Gestational Diabetes

Women in the treatment group had a number of advantages, the researchers found.  "If treated, they were half as likely to have a large baby," Spong says. Large babies are at risk for health problems later in life, including obesity.

Those in the treatment group also were:

  • Less likely to need cesarean delivery. While 26.9% of the treatment group had C-sections, 33.8% of the comparison group did.
  • Less likely to deliver babies with shoulder dystocia, in which the shoulder gets ''stuck'' during delivery and it becomes an obstetrical emergency. Bigger babies are at higher risk.
  • Less likely to have pregnancy-related high blood pressure and preeclampsia.

Neither group experienced stillbirths or newborn deaths, another area the researchers wanted to compare.

Until this study, Spong says, ''it hadn't been known if treating those with mild gestational diabetes improves pregnancy outcome." Now, she says, the study provides evidence supporting screening and treating women even with mild gestational diabetes.

"The treatment is pretty straightforward -- it's diet and exercise," she says. But that's not to say it's simple, she acknowledges, especially if a woman already has young children to care for. The exact diet and exercise instructions in the study were left up to the doctors, she says. Typically advised are carb counting and taking a brisk walk after a meal to help regulate blood sugar levels, Spong says.

The message for pregnant women from the study is clear, says Eva Pressman, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology and director of the maternal fetal medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, N.Y. ''I think the big message is that glucose control is very important for normal fetal growth," she says. ''Even mild forms of gestational diabetes allow elevated levels of glucose to get to the fetus, and that creates hormonal changes in the fetus, in turn leading to excessive growth."

"We know babies who are underweight or overweight have greater risk for health problems in later life, including diabetes," Pressman says. In her experience, most pregnant women, if they are found to have gestational diabetes, are very willing to monitor their diet and make other changes. "Pregnant women are very motivated health-wise," she says.

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