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Health & Pregnancy

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Drinking During Early Pregnancy and Birth Woes

The research didn't examine long-term health threats; March of Dimes critical of the findings

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol during and even beyond the first trimester of pregnancy doesn't seem to raise the risk of premature delivery, low birth weight or size, or high blood pressure complications for the mother, a new study claims.

The study, however, drew sharp criticism from the chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, which recommends against drinking alcohol during pregnancy.

The new study was led by Dr. Fergus McCarthy of the Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research (INFANT), at Cork University Maternity Hospital in Ireland. McCarthy and his colleagues presented their findings in the October issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

The study authors focused on more than 5,600 pregnant women who enrolled in the study between 2004 and 2011 in Australia, Great Britain, Ireland and New Zealand. All the women were interviewed between the 14th and 16th week of pregnancy about their alcohol consumption -- both before becoming pregnant and during the first 15 weeks of gestation.

The majority of the women -- six in 10 -- said they'd consumed some amount of alcohol during the first four months of pregnancy. These women were more likely to be younger, white and single, with a history of smoking or drug use.

Nearly one in five said they'd drank occasionally, meaning one to two "units" of alcohol per week. One unit was defined as equal to a glass of wine or a little less than a 12-ounce bottle of beer.

One quarter said they had engaged in low alcohol consumption, meaning three to seven units a week, while just over 10 percent said they had engaged in moderate consumption -- eight to 14 units a week. Five percent reported drinking heavily -- more than 14 units a week.

At the extreme end, more than one-third of the women said they had consumed six or more units of alcohol in one session in the three months before becoming pregnant -- a practice defined as binge drinking. And nearly a quarter of those women said they'd binged during the first 15 weeks of their pregnancy.

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