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  • Question 1/10

    All sunscreen protects you from sunburn, wrinkles, and age spots.

  • Answer 1/10

    All sunscreen protects you from sunburn, wrinkles, and age spots.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    All sunscreens help prevent sunburn, but only some may help lower the risk of skin cancer.  Only "broad-spectrum" sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher can claim to lower the risk of early skin aging. Broad-spectrum sunscreens protect your skin from both kinds of harmful rays -- ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB). 

  • Question 1/10

    How long will a bottle of sunscreen work?

  • Answer 1/10

    How long will a bottle of sunscreen work?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The FDA requires that sunscreens keep their strength for at least 3 years. But if you're using sunscreen every day and in the right amount, a bottle shouldn't last anywhere near that long. Throw it out if it's past the date on the bottle or if the color or feel of the sunscreen has changed.

  • Question 1/10

    How much sunscreen should you put on?

  • Answer 1/10

    How much sunscreen should you put on?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    That's about an ounce. Most people skimp. They only apply a quarter to a half of the amount of sunscreen they should. The total you need depends on your body size, but you should coat all exposed skin.



    Use sunscreen every day, even when you won't be outside. Apply it 15 minutes before leaving the house. Re-apply about every 2 hours while in the sun. Do it again after swimming or sweating a lot.

  • Question 1/10

    Which should you apply first?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which should you apply first?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    After your moisturizer, you should apply sunscreen, then makeup. Some moisturizers and makeup also have SPF sun protection.

     

    If you're using bug spray, apply it last. When sunscreen is put on top of bug spray, both are less effective.

     

  • Answer 1/10

    How safe is sunscreen?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nearly all top experts and skin-health groups say sunscreen is safe -- and works! Claims that suggest danger are based on iffy science. A major study tracked more than 1,600 adults over 10 years. Those who wore sunscreen every day cut their risk of melanoma in half.

  • Question 1/10

    You need sunscreen even on a cloudy day.

  • Answer 1/10

    You need sunscreen even on a cloudy day.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Overcast skies won't protect your skin from skin cancers or early aging. Up to 80% of the sun's rays pass through fog and clouds. Be extra careful around sand, water, snow, or concrete. These amp up the sun's harmful effects. Wear a hat, along with sunscreen.

  • Question 1/10

    An SPF 30 sunscreen protects you better than SPF 15.

  • Answer 1/10

    An SPF 30 sunscreen protects you better than SPF 15.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Dermatologists recommend using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30. That should block 97% of UVB rays. But no matter the SPF number, you should reapply every 2 hours to make sure you're protected.

  • Question 1/10

    Why are new sunscreen labels better than before?

  • Answer 1/10

    Why are new sunscreen labels better than before?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    In 2013, the FDA began testing all sunscreen products for both UVA and UVB protection. If they pass and have both, they're now called "broad spectrum."

     

    Only broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher can claim to reduce skin cancer and early aging. Others can only say they help prevent sunburn.

     

    The words "waterproof," "sweatproof," and "sunblock" are no longer allowed because they're untrue.

  • Question 1/10

    What's the longest you can stay in the water with water-resistant sunscreen?

  • Answer 1/10

    What's the longest you can stay in the water with water-resistant sunscreen?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    No sunscreen is waterproof. Like all sunscreens, water-resistant products should be reapplied after 2 hours. That's true whether you're in or out of the water. Be sure to reapply after you dry off.

  • Question 1/10

    Darker-skinned people don't need sunscreen.

  • Answer 1/10

    Darker-skinned people don't need sunscreen.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Everyone needs sunscreen. In all races, basal cell carcinoma -- the most common skin cancer -- is usually due to sun exposure.

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    Good job. Your sunscreen know-how is more than skin deep.

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    Not bad, but don't let it get under your skin. Just read up and try again. 

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Sources | Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on August 19, 2015 Medically Reviewed on August 19, 2015

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on
August 19, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY: Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology Public Resource Newsletter: "Apply Products in this Sequence," "Sunscreen Remains a Safe, Effective Form of Sun Protection," "Sunscreens," "Skin of Color."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer Prevention and Early Detection."

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Harvard Medical School): "True or False: Dark-skinned People Don't Need Sunscreen?"

CDC: "Insect Repellant Use and Safety."

FDA: "FDA Announces Changes to Better Inform Consumers About Sunscreen."

Ministère de la Famille et des Aînés/College of Medicine of Quebec: "Protocol for Applying Insect Repellent."

Neale, R. Arch Dermatol , October 2002.

Skin Cancer Foundation: "Sunscreen Safety: The Reality," "Sunscreens Explained," "The Skin Cancer Foundation's Guide to Sunscreens – Should Sunscreen be Used Only by People of High Risk?" "What Goes on First?"

 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.