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Cancer Health Center

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Your Cancer Support Team: Who’s on Your Side?

Build the Best Cancer Support Team for All Your Needs
WebMD Feature

If you’ve just been diagnosed with cancer, you’re probably still reeling. You may be grappling with issues that are profound -- like life and death -- and mundane -- like who will do the laundry when you’re in the hospital?

But you won’t fight this alone. Of course, you’ll have your family and friends. And you’ll have your doctor. But your medical care won’t just be in the hands of a single MD. Instead, you’ll need a whole cancer support team to help you through this. “Good cancer treatment always requires a lot of people,” says Jan C. Buckner, MD, chair of medical oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

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General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Incidence and Mortality Estimated new cases and deaths from soft tissue sarcoma in the United States in 2014:[1] New cases: 12,020. Deaths: 4,740. Soft tissue sarcomas are malignant tumors that arise in any of the mesodermal tissues of the extremities (50%), trunk and retroperitoneum (40%), or head and neck (10%). The reported international incidence rates range from 1.8 to 5 per 100,000 per year.[2] Risk Factors and Genetic Factors The risk of sporadic soft tissue sarcomas...

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Of course, you may be wondering how this system works. How can you -- when you are probably feeling overwhelmed already -- pick an entire cancer support team? Here’s what you need to know.

Why Do You Need a Cancer Support Team?

Treating cancer often requires more than one approach -- not just chemotherapy for instance, but surgery or radiation, too. That usually means more than one doctor.

But good medical care is more than just treating the cancer itself. Cancer can affect every aspect of your life: your mood, your diet, and your family, to name a few. So you may need nurses, dietitians, therapists, and other experts on your cancer support team. People you may never meet -- like pathologists and anesthesiologists -- also help while working behind the scenes.

Having all of these experts on your cancer support team is invaluable. “Each member of the team can each bring a different perspective to diagnosis and treatment,” says Terri Ades, MS, APRN-BC, AOCN, director of cancer information at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta. “With more people on your team, you get more options.”

The Heart of Your Cancer Support Team: Your Doctor and Nurse

First things first: you need to start with a doctor. Usually this will be a medical or surgical oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating cancer. Given the stakes, settling on an oncologist can be nerve-wracking. However, Harold J. Burstein, MD -- a staff oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School -- urges people not to fret too much.

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