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Leukemia & Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Leukemia & Lymphoma

  1. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  2. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258002-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment

  3. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview for Adult NHL

    Treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) depends on the histologic type and stage. Many of the improvements in survival have been made using clinical trials (experimental therapy) that have attempted to improve on the best available accepted therapy (conventional or standard therapy). In asymptomatic patients with indolent forms of advanced NHL, treatment may be deferred until the patient becomes symptomatic as the disease progresses. When treatment is deferred, the clinical course of patients with indolent NHL varies; frequent and careful observation is required so that effective treatment can be initiated when the clinical course of the disease accelerates. Some patients have a prolonged indolent course, but others have disease that rapidly evolves into more aggressive types of NHL that require immediate treatment.Radiation techniques differ somewhat from those used in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. The dose of radiation therapy usually varies from 25 Gy to 50 Gy and is

  4. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - High-Stage Childhood B-cell NHL Treatment

    Patients with high-stage (stage III or stage IV) mature B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) have an 80% to 90% long-term survival.[1,2,3] Unlike mature B-lineage NHL seen in adults, there is no difference in outcome based on histology (Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) with current therapy in pediatric trials.[1,2,3]Involvement of the bone marrow may lead to confusion as to whether the patient has lymphoma or leukemia. Traditionally, patients with more than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having mature B-cell leukemia, and those with fewer than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having lymphoma. It is not clear whether these arbitrary definitions are biologically distinct, but there is no question that patients with Burkitt leukemia should be treated with protocols designed for Burkitt lymphoma.[1,3]Tumor lysis syndrome is often present at diagnosis or after initiation of

  5. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Aggressive, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Patients with stage I or contiguous stage II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are candidates for combination chemotherapy with or without involved-field radiation therapy (IF-XRT).The following drug combinations are referred to in this section:R-CHOP: rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, + cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.Standard Treatment Options for Aggressive, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for aggressive, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:R-CHOP with or without IF-XRT.R-CHOP with or without IF-XRTFour prospective randomized trials have evaluated the comparison of CHOP or more intensive CHOP-based chemotherapy alone versus combined–modality therapy with CHOP and IF-XRT.[1,2,3,4,5]Evidence (CHOP vs. CHOP with IF-XRT): In a randomized trial with 7 years' median follow-up, 576 patients older than 60 years with early-stage disease received four cycles of CHOP with or without IF-XRT;

  6. Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    Important It is possible that the main title of the report Granulomatosis, Lymphomatoid is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report. ...

  7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Indolent NHL

    Indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Follicular lymphoma.Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström macroglobulinemia).Marginal zone lymphoma.Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Follicular LymphomaFollicular lymphoma comprises 20% of all NHLs and as many as 70% of the indolent lymphomas reported in American and European clinical trials.[1,2,3] Most patients with follicular lymphoma are age 50 years and older and present with widespread disease at diagnosis. Nodal involvement is most common and is often accompanied by splenic and bone marrow disease. Rearrangement of the bcl-2 gene is present in more than 90% of patients with follicular lymphoma; overexpression of the bcl-2 protein is associated with the inability to eradicate the lymphoma by inhibiting apoptosis.[4]PrognosisDespite the advanced stage, the median survival ranges from 8 to 15 years, leading to the

  8. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus

  9. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Childhood NHL Treatment

    Outcome for recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in children and adolescents depends on histologic subtype. A Children's Cancer Group study (CCG-5912) was able to achieve complete remission (CR) in 40% of NHL patients.[1] A Pediatric Oncology Group study showed a 70% response rate and 40% CR rate.[2] Radiation therapy may have a role in treating patients who have not had a complete response to chemotherapy. All patients with primary refractory or relapsed NHL should be considered for clinical trials. For recurrent or refractory B-lineage NHL, survival is generally 10% to 20%.[3,4,5,6,7] Chemoresistance is a major problem, making remission difficult to achieve. There is no standard treatment option for patients with recurrent or progressive disease. The use of single-agent rituximab, and rituximab combined with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, has shown activity in the treatment of B-cell lymphoma patients.[8][Level of evidence: 3iiiDii] A Children's Oncology Group (COG) study

  10. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about chronic myeloproliferative disorders, see the following: Myeloproliferative Disorders Home PageDrugs Approved for Myeloproliferative DisordersBiological Therapies for CancerBone Marrow Transplantation and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell TransplantationUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

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