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    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency (G6PDD) is an inherited, sex-linked, metabolic disorder characterized by an enzyme defect that leads to the breakdown of red blood cells (hemolysis) upon exposure to stresses associated with some bacterial infections or certain drugs. A deficiency of this enzyme may result in the premature destruction of red blood cells (an acute hemolytic anemia or a chronic spherocytic type) when an affected individual is exposed to certain medications or chemicals, experiences certain viral or bacterial infections, and/or inhales the pollen of, or consumes, fava beans (favism).

    Glucose- 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency is inherited as an X-linked genetic trait. It is a common inborn error of metabolism among humans. More than 300 variants of the disorder have been identified, resulting from mutations of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase gene. The severity of symptoms associated with G6PD Deficiency may vary greatly among affected individuals, depending upon the specific form of the disorder that is present.

    Neonatal G6PDD is particularly dangerous to an infant. It is manageable if caught early, and screening for the disorder is common.

    The role of the enzyme G6PD is to maintain the pathway to generate a chemical called glutathione, which in a particular form is an antioxidant. The antioxidant is necessary to protect the cell's hemoglobin and its cell wall (red cell membrane). If the level of antioxidant is too low, then the cell's hemoglobin will not bind oxygen (its main purpose); the cell wall will break allowing the cell contents, including the modified hemoglobin, to spill out.

    Resources

    CLIMB (Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases)
    Climb Building
    176 Nantwich Road
    Crewe, CW2 6BG
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 4408452412173
    Fax: 4408452412174
    Email: enquiries@climb.org.uk
    Internet: http://www.CLIMB.org.uk

    NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
    Office of Communications & Public Liaison
    Bldg 31, Rm 9A06
    31 Center Drive, MSC 2560
    Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
    Tel: (301)496-3583
    Email: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/

    Parents of Infants and Children with Kernicterus (P.I.C.K.)
    One W. Superior Street
    Suite 2410
    Chicago, IL 60610
    USA
    Tel: (312)274-9695
    Email: info@pickonline.org
    Internet: http://www.pickonline.org/

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Madisons Foundation
    PO Box 241956
    Los Angeles, CA 90024
    Tel: (310)264-0826
    Fax: (310)264-4766
    Email: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
    Internet: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org

    G6PD Deficiency Association [Associazione Italiana Favismo, onlus]
    Via Amba Aradam 12
    30173 Mestre-Venice
    Italy
    Tel: 0416391105
    Fax: 0415347807
    Email: info@favismo.it
    Internet: http://www.g6pd.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 5/23/2008
    Copyright 1990, 1995, 1998, 2002 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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