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    Sly Syndrome

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Sly Syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • Beta-Glucuronidase Deficiency
    • MPS Disorder, type VII
    • MPS VII
    • mucopolysaccharidosis type VII
    • GUSB deficiency

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Mucopolysaccharidoses, which are also known as mucopolysaccharide storage (MPS) diseases, are a group of rare genetic disorders caused by the deficiency of one of ten specific lysosomal enzymes. The lysosomes are particles bound in membranes within cells that break down certain fats and carbohydrates (mucopolysaccharides) into simpler molecules. The accumulation of these large, undegraded mucopolysaccharides in the cells of the body causes a number of physical symptoms and abnormalities.

    Sly syndrome (MPS-VII) is an MPS storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucuronidase that leads to an accumulation of dermatan sulfate (DS), heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) in many tissues and organs of the body including the central nervous system.

    The clinical features of Sly syndrome vary from patient to patient, but all have short stature due to growth retardation, changes in bones visible on X-rays and some degree of mental retardation. Survival into adulthood is common with milder cases and osteoarthritis is a common complication.

    The symptoms of Sly Syndrome are similar to those of Hurler Syndrome (MPS I) and the other Mucopolysaccharidoses. Symptoms may include mental retardation, short stature with an unusually short trunk, and/or abnormalities of the intestines, corneas of the eyes, and/or the skeletal system. Sly Syndrome is inherited as an autosomal recessive genetic trait.

    Resources

    CLIMB (Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases)
    Climb Building
    176 Nantwich Road
    Crewe, CW2 6BG
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 4408452412173
    Fax: 4408452412174
    Email: enquiries@climb.org.uk
    Internet: http://www.CLIMB.org.uk

    Vaincre Les Maladies Lysosomales
    2 Ter Avenue
    Massy, 91300
    France
    Tel: 0169754030
    Fax: 0160111583
    Email: accueil@vml-asso.org
    Internet: http://www.vml-asso.org

    The Arc
    1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200
    Washington, DC 20006
    Tel: (202)534-3700
    Fax: (202)534-3731
    Tel: (800)433-5255
    TDD: (817)277-0553
    Email: info@thearc.org
    Internet: http://www.thearc.org

    National MPS Society, Inc.
    PO Box 14686
    Durham, NC 27709
    Tel: (919)806-0101
    Fax: (919)806-2055
    Tel: (877)677-1001
    Email: info@mpssociety.org
    Internet: http://www.mpssociety.org

    NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
    Office of Communications & Public Liaison
    Bldg 31, Rm 9A06
    31 Center Drive, MSC 2560
    Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
    Tel: (301)496-3583
    Email: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/

    Society for Mucopolysaccharide Diseases
    MPS House
    Repton Place
    White Lion Road
    Amersham
    Buckinghamshire, HP7 9LP
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 08453899901
    Fax: 08453899902
    Email: mps@mpssociety.co.uk
    Internet: http://www.mpssociety.co.uk

    Canadian Society for Mucopolysaccharide and Related Diseases, Inc.
    PO Box 30034
    RPO Parkgate
    North Vancouver
    British Columbia, V7H 2Y8
    Canada
    Tel: 6049245130
    Fax: 6049245131
    Tel: 8006671846
    Email: info@mpssociety.ca
    Internet: http://www.mpssociety.ca

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Hide & Seek Foundation for Lysosomal Disease Research
    6475 East Pacific Coast Highway Suite 466
    Long Beach, CA 90803
    Tel: (877)621-1122
    Fax: (866)215-8850
    Email: info@hideandseek.org
    Internet: http://www.hideandseek.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 5/12/2008
    Copyright 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1994, 1995, 2003 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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