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Flu Prevention Strategies

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If we don't take the right precautions, odds are that up to one in five of us will catch the flu in any given flu season.

For most of us, having the flu means suffering at home for a week or two, then pulling ourselves out of bed to get on with our lives as usual. But the flu can be serious, even deadly, particularly for anyone with a health condition like asthma, heart disease, diabetes, or a weakened immune system. Depending on the severity of the flu season, between 3, 000 and 49,000 people die from the flu each year.

Recommended Related to Cold & Flu

The Flu and You: Your Urgent Response Guide

You can take all the precautions in the world, but sometimes the flu sneaks around your defenses. So what do you do when someone in your house has the flu -- or even swine flu? To give you an idea, here's a countdown of five average days with the flu. Keep in mind that this rundown is based on a typical case of seasonal flu. There's still a lot we don't know about swine flu. But so far, its symptoms seem to be pretty similar to those of common seasonal flu viruses.

Read the The Flu and You: Your Urgent Response Guide article > >

Before the flu can knock you out, you can deliver the first punch.  Here are proven strategies to help you avoid flu germs -- and the misery of a flu. 

Get Vaccinated

Experts say the single best way to avoid the flu is to get vaccinated as soon as the vaccine is available in your area. The ideal time to get your flu shot is early fall. But any time during the winter is fine if you haven't already gotten it.

The vaccine is engineered to protect against the flu strains health experts believe will be most widespread each season -- for example, the H1N1 "swine flu." Some flu vaccines protect against three flu strains (trivalent). Others guard against four strains (quadrivalent).

Several types of flu vaccines are available:

  • The flu "shot" contains a dead virus. There is a brand approved for people ages 6 months and older injected into the muscle. Also, an intradermal shot is available that uses a smaller needle that only goes into the top layer of the skin instead of the muscle. It's available for those aged 18 to 64.
  • The nasal spray -- FluMist -- contains a live but weakened form of the virus. It's approved for anyone between the ages of 2 and 49 who is healthy and not pregnant. The CDC now recommends the nasal spray vaccine for healthy children 2 through 8 years old when it is available.
  • Egg-free vaccines are now available for those aged 18 to 49 who have severe egg allergies.
  • For those age 65 and older, a high-dose version of the flu vaccine called Fluzone is recommended when available. It may be more effective at protecting an older person's immune system.  

Don't try to make excuses for skipping the flu vaccine. Your arm might be a little sore the next day. And you may feel a little achy or run a low fever afterward. But you can't catch the flu from the vaccine, because it contains a weakened or killed form of the virus.

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