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Flu Hitting Younger Adults Hard, Vaccination Helps

Hospitalizations, deaths up for people 18 to 64
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Mary Brophy Marcus

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The flu is hitting younger and middle-aged adults unusually hard this season, but getting vaccinated reduces the need for a doctor's care, U.S. health officials said Thursday.

People aged 18 to 64 represent 61 percent of all flu hospitalizations this flu season, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This age group accounted for only about 35 percent of flu-related hospitalizations the last three seasons, officials said at a CDC news conference.

"We think one of the reasons flu is hitting younger adults hard is that such a low proportion get a flu shot, even those with underlying conditions like asthma, COPD, and diabetes," said CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden at the news conference.

"The bottom line is, influenza can make anyone very sick, very fast and it can kill. Vaccination every season is the single most important thing you can do to protect yourself," he added.

More deaths than usual have occurred among younger and middle-aged adults this season, too. People 25 to 64 years old have accounted for about 60 percent of flu deaths -- triple the rate for that age group three seasons ago, the CDC said.

Flu activity will likely keep up for several more weeks, especially in places where flu surfaced later in the season, the CDC officials noted. Southern states, especially Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, saw an early spike in flu activity this season. During January, flu activity decreased in the Southeast and South Central states but picked up in the West and Northeast, health officials said.

The currently circulating H1N1 virus, which is striking younger adults, emerged in 2009 and triggered a pandemic. H1N1 viruses have continued to circulate since the 2009 pandemic, but this is the first season since then that they have predominated in the United States, according to the CDC officials.

While flu hospitalizations are still highest among the elderly, adults aged 50 to 64 now have the second-highest hospitalization rate followed by children up to 4 years old. During the 2009 pandemic, people 50 to 64 years also had the second-highest hospitalization rate, the CDC said.

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