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Colorectal Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Colorectal Cancer

  1. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage II Rectal Cancer

    Treatment options:Preoperative chemoradiation with fluorouracil (5-FU) for patients with clinically staged T3 or T4 rectal adenocarcinoma.Total mesorectal excision (TME) with either low anterior resection (LAR) or abdominoperineal resection (APR).Postoperative chemoradiation for patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who did not receive preoperative chemoradiation.Four to six months of 5-FU-based chemotherapy postoperatively.A clinical trial.Prior to the standard use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II and III rectal cancer, several studies established the benefits of adjuvant combined-modality therapy for surgical stage II and III disease. Intergroup protocol 86-47-51 (MAYO-864751) demonstrated a 10% improvement in overall survival (OS) with the use of continuous-infusion 5-FU (225 mg/m2 /day throughout the entire course of radiation therapy) compared with bolus 5-FU (500 mg/m2 /day for three consecutive days during the first and fifth weeks of radiation).[1][Level of

  2. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Rectal Cancer

    After rectal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the rectum or to other parts of the body.The process used to find out whether cancer has spread within the rectum or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen, pelvis, or chest, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly.

  3. What You Need to Know About Proctoscopy

    Proctoscopy is a quick examination of the rectum to look for signs of colorectal cancer. WebMD tells you what to expect from the test.

  4. Specialists Who Treat Colorectal Cancer

    WebMD guides you through the process of assembling a medical team of specialists to provide the very best treatment plan for colorectal cancer.

  5. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    WebMD explains the function of the colon and rectum and how colorectal cancer starts.

  6. Tips for Family and Friends of Cancer Patients

    A cancer diagnosis can profoundly affect family and friends. WebMD offers coping tips for loved ones.

  7. Living With a Colostomy

    Having a colostomy requires adjustments, but doesn't have to change your life. Learn more from WebMD.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Learn more from WebMD about preventing colorectal cancer.

  9. Colorectal Cancer and Fatigue

    If you're experiencing fatigue from colorectal cancer treatment, try these coping suggestions from WebMD.

  10. Avastin Questions and Answers

    WebMD answers questions about Avastin, a drug used in the treatment of colorectal and other cancers.

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