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Colorectal Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Colorectal Cancer

  1. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview for Colon Cancer

    Table 6. Standard Treatment Options for Stages 0–III Colon CancerStage (TNM Staging Criteria)Standard Treatment OptionsStage 0 Colon CancerSurgeryStage I Colon CancerSurgeryStage II Colon CancerSurgeryStage III Colon CancerSurgery Adjuvant chemotherapyTable 7. Treatment Options for Stage IV and Recurrent Colon CancerStage (TNM Staging Criteria)Treatment OptionsTreatment of Liver MetastasisSurgeryNeoadjuvant chemotherapyLocal ablationAdjuvant chemotherapyIntra-arterial chemotherapyTreatment of Stage IV and Recurrent Colon CancerSurgeryChemotherapy and targeted therapySecond-line chemotherapyPrimary Surgical TherapyStandard treatment for patients with colon cancer has been open surgical resection of the primary and regional lymph nodes for localized disease.The role of laparoscopic techniques [1,2,3,4] in the treatment of colon cancer has been examined in two studies.Evidence (laparoscopic techniques):A multicenter, prospective, randomized, noninferiority trial

  2. Lynch Syndrome

    Important It is possible that the main title of the report Lynch Syndromes is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report. ...

  3. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about colorectal cancer prevention. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process

  4. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062687-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Colon Cancer Treatment

  5. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)Treatment of stage 0 may include the following: Simple polypectomy.Local excision.Resection (when the tumor is too large to remove by local excision).Internal or external radiation therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage 0 rectal cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.Stage I Rectal CancerTreatment of stage I rectal cancer may include the following:Local excision.Resection.Resection with radiation therapy and chemotherapy before

  6. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (07 / 25 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Evidence of BenefitRevised text about five sigmoidoscopy screening randomized controlled trials to state that there was an overall 28% relative reduction in colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality, an 18% relative reduction in CRC incidence, and a 33% relative reduction in the incidence of left-sided CRC.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  7. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Avoiding risk factors and increasing protective factors may help prevent cancer.Avoiding cancer risk factors may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being overweight, and not getting enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and exercising may also help prevent some cancers. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional about how you might lower your risk of cancer.The following risk factors increase the risk of colorectal cancer:AgeThe risk of colorectal cancer increases after age 50. Most cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed after age 50.Family history of colorectal cancerHaving a parent, brother, sister, or child with colorectal cancer doubles a person's risk of colorectal cancer.Personal historyHaving a personal history of inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Inherited riskThe risk of colorectal cancer is increased when certain gene changes linked to familial

  9. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about colorectal cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in

  10. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Colon Cancer

    Related Summaries Note: Other PDQ summaries containing information related to colon cancer include the following: Colorectal Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Prevention Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment (childhood cancer of the colon) Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from colon cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 102,900 (colon ...

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