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Colorectal Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Colorectal Cancer

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062753-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Colorectal Cancer Screening

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Significance

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide [1] and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.[2] It is estimated that there will be 142,820 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013 and 50,830 deaths due to this disease. From 2005 to 2009, CRC incidence declined by 4.1% per year among adults aged 50 years and older. However, in adults younger than 50 years, CRC incidence rates have been increasing by 1.1% per year. From 2005 to 2009, mortality from CRC declined by 2.4% per year in men and 3.1% per year in women.[2] The incidence is higher in men than in women. It ranges from 46.1 per 100,000 per year in Hispanic men to 66.9 per 100,000 per year in African American men. In women, it ranges from 31.9 per 100,000 per year in Hispanics to 50.3 per 100,000 per year in African Americans.[3] The age-adjusted mortality rates for men and women are 20.2 per 100,000 per year in men and 14.1 per 100,000 per year in women.[3] About 5%

  3. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    Primary Surgical TherapyThe primary treatment for patients with rectal cancer is surgical resection of the primary tumor. Local excision of clinical T1 tumors is an acceptable surgical technique for appropriately selected patients. For all but T1 tumors, a mesorectal excision is the treatment of choice. Very selected patients with T2 tumors may be candidates for local excision. Local failure rates in the range of 4% to 8% following rectal resection with appropriate mesorectal excision (total mesorectal excision [TME] for low/middle rectal tumors and mesorectal excision at least 5 cm below the tumor for high rectal tumors) have been reported.[1,2,3,4,5]The low incidence of local relapse following meticulous mesorectal excision has led some investigators to question the routine use of adjuvant radiation therapy. Because of an increased tendency for first failure in locoregional sites only, the impact of perioperative radiation therapy is greater in rectal

  4. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification and Pathology of Rectal Cancer

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the colon and rectum include the following:[1]Epithelial TumorsAdenomaTubular.Villous.Tubulovillous.Serrated.Intraepithelial neoplasia (dysplasia) associated with chronic inflammatory diseasesLow-grade glandular intraepithelial neoplasia.High-grade glandular intraepithelial neoplasia.CarcinomaAdenocarcinoma.Mucinous adenocarcinoma.Signet-ring cell carcinoma.Small cell carcinoma.Adenosquamous carcinoma.Medullary carcinoma.Undifferentiated carcinoma.Carcinoid (well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm)Enterochromaffin (EC)-cell, serotonin-producing neoplasm.L-cell, glucagon-like peptide and pancreatic polypeptide/peptide YY (PYY)-producing tumor.Others.Mixed carcinoma-adenocarcinomaOthers.Nonepithelial TumorsLipoma.Leiomyoma.Gastrointestinal stromal tumor.Leiomyosarcoma.Angiosarcoma.Kaposi sarcoma.Melanoma.Others.Malignant lymphomasMarginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type.Mantle cell

  5. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Description of the Evidence

    BackgroundIncidence and mortalityColorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide [1] and the second leading cause of cancer deaths (irrespective of gender) in the United States.[2] It is estimated that there will be 142,820 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013 and 50,830 deaths due to this disease.[2] Between 2005 and 2009, CRC incidence rates in the United States declined by 4.1% per year among adults aged 50 years and older.[2] For the past 20 years, the mortality rate has been declining in both men and women. Between 2005 and 2009, the mortality rate declined by 2.4% per year in men and by 3.1% per year in women. In adults younger than 50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by about 1.1% per year.[2] The overall 5-year survival rate is 64%. About 5% of Americans are expected to develop the disease

  6. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (09 / 27 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  7. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Colon Cancer

    Treatment decisions should be made with reference to the TNM classification [1] rather than to the older Dukes or the Modified Astler-Coller classification schema.The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and a National Cancer Institute–sponsored panel recommended that at least 12 lymph nodes be examined in patients with colon and rectal cancer to confirm the absence of nodal involvement by tumor.[2,3,4] This recommendation takes into consideration that the number of lymph nodes examined is a reflection of the aggressiveness of lymphovascular mesenteric dissection at the time of surgical resection and the pathologic identification of nodes in the specimen. Retrospective studies demonstrated that the number of lymph nodes examined in colon and rectal surgery may be associated with patient outcome.[5,6,7,8]AJCC Stage Groupings and TNM DefinitionsThe AJCC has designated staging by TNM classification to define

  8. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Overview

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Colorectal Cancer Screening; Colon Cancer Treatment; and Rectal Cancer Treatment are also available.Factors Associated With Increased Risk of Colorectal CancerExcessive alcohol useBased on solid evidence from observational studies, excessive alcohol use is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).[1,2,3]Magnitude of Effect: A pooled analysis of eight cohort studies estimated an adjusted relative risk (RR) of 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–1.72) for consumption exceeding 45 g/day.Study Design: Cohort studies.Internal Validity: Fair.Consistency: Fair.External Validity: Fair.Cigarette smokingBased on solid evidence, cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence and mortality from CRC.Magnitude of Effect: A pooled analysis of 106 observational studies estimated an adjusted RR (current smokers vs. never smokers) for developing CRC of 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25).Study Design:

  10. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage II Rectal Cancer

    Treatment options:Preoperative chemoradiation with fluorouracil (5-FU) for patients with clinically staged T3 or T4 rectal adenocarcinoma.Total mesorectal excision (TME) with either low anterior resection (LAR) or abdominoperineal resection (APR).Postoperative chemoradiation for patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who did not receive preoperative chemoradiation.Four to six months of 5-FU-based chemotherapy postoperatively.A clinical trial.Prior to the standard use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II and III rectal cancer, several studies established the benefits of adjuvant combined-modality therapy for surgical stage II and III disease. Intergroup protocol 86-47-51 (MAYO-864751) demonstrated a 10% improvement in overall survival (OS) with the use of continuous-infusion 5-FU (225 mg/m2 /day throughout the entire course of radiation therapy) compared with bolus 5-FU (500 mg/m2 /day for three consecutive days during the first and fifth weeks of radiation).[1][Level of

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