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Epilepsy Health Center

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Epilepsy Treatments: Find the Right Medication

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Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes repeated episodes of unprovoked seizures. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medications may help keep symptoms under control. Epilepsy is almost always treated first with medication.

Choosing the right one, however, can be challenging. There are at least 20 different drugs available to prevent seizures. Some have been around for decades. Many others have only been developed recently, and each drug comes with its own benefits and risks. Also, side effects and dosing schedules vary from drug to drug.

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Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a rare and severe kind of epilepsy that starts in childhood. Children with LGS have seizures often, and they have several different kinds of seizures. This condition is hard to treat, but researchers are looking for new therapies. Finding practical and emotional support is key to help you give your child the best quality of life while facing the challenges and stress this illness brings. The seizures usually start between ages 2 and 6. Children with LGS have learning...

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The ultimate goal of treatment is to establish control and be free from seizures. But sometimes, even after control has been established, people may still have a seizure, often referred to as a breakthrough seizure.

To help determine which medication you should try first, your doctor will carefully review your medical history and lifestyle. It's important to remember that epilepsy treatment is tailored to the individual. What works for you may not work for someone else. And some people may need to take more than one medication.

What Are Epilepsy Medications?

Your doctor or nurse may refer to epilepsy medications as antiepileptic drugs or AEDs. Other names used are anticonvulsants or antiseizure drugs. Sometimes, the drugs are just called seizure drugs. These medications help suppress the faulty signaling in the brain that leads to seizures. You must take epilepsy medication every day as directed, even when you aren't having symptoms. Some people need to take epilepsy medication for life.

The goals of using medications to treat epilepsy include:

  • Having no or few seizures
  • Having no or few side effects
  • Using only one epilepsy medication, called monotherapy

Choosing the Right Epilepsy Medication

Which epilepsy medication is best for you depends on many factors, including:

Type of epilepsy. There are different forms of epilepsy, and each may cause a different type of seizure. It's very important that your doctor determine what type of epilepsy you have. Not all medications work on all types of seizures. And, sometimes, an epilepsy medication can make seizures worse. If your doctor can't determine what type of seizures you have, you may be prescribed what's known as a "broad-spectrum" epilepsy medication. Broad-spectrum means it can work on a wide range of seizures.

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