Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Epilepsy Health Center

Select An Article

Epilepsy Seizures and Driving

    Font Size

    Driving with epilepsy means balancing the need for independence against the need for safety.

    We prefer the freedom of being able to travel independently whenever and wherever we need to. For this reason, many of us rely on cars to get to work, school, shopping, and social events. For most young adults, obtaining a driver's license is an important milestone.

    Recommended Related to Epilepsy

    What Is Benign Rolandic Epilepsy?

    Benign rolandic epilepsy is one form of epilepsy. With this condition, seizures affect the face and sometimes the body. As a result, the disorder causes problems for some children. It almost always disappears, though, by adolescence.

    Read the What Is Benign Rolandic Epilepsy? article > >

    Each state has individual driving regulations. People with epilepsy are required to report their condition to their State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). However, states require different people to do the reporting. Some states require the doctor to contact the DMV. Other states require the patient to sign a simple form at the time of application for a license or at the time of license renewal, declaring that they will notify the DMV of changes in their health status or driving ability.

    When a person with epilepsy wishes to drive for the first time, an application will need to be filled out. When someone who already holds a driver's license is newly diagnosed with epilepsy, that person is responsible to notify the proper authority.

    Individuals with uncontrolled seizures have a higher risk of an accident if they drive, which is why doctors advise patients with seizures that they should not drive until their seizures are under control. This may be after six months or a year depending on the state. If a well-controlled person has a seizure after the doctor changes the medication, the patient may or may not be able to continue driving.

    Seizures are unpredictable and even a small seizure at the wrong time can lead to an injury or death. The best solution, if possible, is to get the seizures under control. To do this, work together with your doctor to get on the right treatment and to honestly discuss your seizures with him or her.

    Information is subject to change. Please contact your state's DMV office for the most current information.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Richard Senelick, MD on May 25, 2014
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    human head and brain waves
    Causes, symptoms, and treatments.
    Grand mal seizure
    How is each one different?
    marijuana plant
    CBD, a plant chemical, may cut down seizures.
    prescription bottle
    Which medication is right for you?
    Seizures Driving
    Questions for Doctor Epilepsy
    Graces Magic Diet
    Pills spilling from bottle in front of clock
    first aid kit
    Caring Child Epilepsy
    Making Home Safe
    epilepsy monitoring

    WebMD Special Sections