Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Eye Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Artificially Grown Corneas Could Be Used for Transplants and Drug, Cosmetic Testing

continued...

"If these cells are, in fact, 'immortalized' they are going to continue to grow," Whikehart tells WebMD. "Normally, corneal cells ... are contact inhibited -- they stop growing when they make contact with each other. If these cells do not stop growing, the result would be a deformed cornea and doubtful vision."

H. Dwight Cavanagh, MD, PhD, a corneal surgeon and biologist, questions whether these particular lab-grown human corneas will be useful for either toxicity testing or as transplants.

"Their goal is laudable and the study represents a potential breakthrough, but it should not be ballyhooed as a solution to either the toxicity problem or the transplant problem," Cavanagh tells WebMD.

Griffith's research was supported by the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association through the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and from Proctor & Gamble Co. through the International Program for Animal Alternatives.

Vital Information:

  • Scientists have developed artificial human corneas that look and function like real ones.
  • The researchers hope that the artificial tissue will one day be used for transplants or to replace animal testing for drugs and cosmetics.
  • Objective commentators say those uses aren't currently possible.
1 | 2

Today on WebMD

businesswoman wearing fun eyeglasses
Slideshow
Pink Eye Slideshow
Slideshow
 
Woman with itchy watery eyes
Slideshow
grilled salmon and spinach
Video
 

Understanding Stye
Article
human eye
Article
 
eye
Video
eye exam timing
Video
 

vision test
Tool
is vision correction surgery for you
Article
 
high tech contacts
Article
eye drop
Article