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Eye Health Center

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Glaucoma Screening - Topic Overview

If you are younger than 40 and have no known risk factors for glaucoma, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recommends that you have a complete eye exam every 5 to 10 years. This includes tests that check for glaucoma.1 The AAO suggests more frequent routine eye exams as you age.

The AAO also suggests that people who are at risk for glaucoma have complete eye exams according to the schedule below:

Recommended Related to Eye Health

Understanding Black Eye -- Symptoms

The signs of a black eye include bruising and swelling of the eyelid and soft tissue around the injured eye, sometimes accompanied by broken blood vessels along the white of the eye, called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. The discoloration starts out deep purple or blue, then may turn green or yellow before disappearing, usually in about a week.

Read the Understanding Black Eye -- Symptoms article > >

  • Ages 40 to 54, every 1 to 3 years
  • Ages 55 to 64, every 1 to 2 years
  • Ages 65 and older, every 6 to 12 months

Your eye doctor may advise you to have eye exams more often, depending on your level of risk and your overall eye health.

People at increased risk for glaucoma include those who:2

Because people with glaucoma may have normal pressures in their eyes, measuring eye pressure (tonometry) should not be used as the only test for glaucoma. It needs to be combined with other tests before glaucoma can be diagnosed.

After reviewing all of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has not recommended for or against routine glaucoma screening for all adults.3

For more information about glaucoma and vision screening, see the topics Glaucoma and Vision Tests.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: September 09, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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