Skip to content

    50+: Live Better, Longer

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Cochlear Implants and Seniors' Mood, Thinking

    Older people with severe hearing loss who received the devices had less depression, better mental skills

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Robert Preidt

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cochlear implants not only boost hearing in seniors with severe hearing loss, they might also enhance their emotional state and thinking abilities, a new study finds.

    A cochlear implant is a small device that helps provide a sense of sound to people who are deaf or have significant hearing loss, according to the U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

    This new study was funded by the makers of cochlear implants. It included 94 people, aged 65 to 85, who were assessed before, and then six and 12 months after, receiving an implant.

    While the study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, the cochlear implants were associated with improved speech perception in quiet and noisy settings, better quality of life, lower rates of depression and improved thinking skills, the researchers found.

    "This study has tremendous implications," said one expert, Dr. Ian Storper, director of otology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. But he said questions remain.

    "Can improvement of hearing loss improve our ability to think? How poor does the hearing have to be to benefit? Does the cause of the hearing loss matter? Does the cause or degree of the cognitive [mental] impairment matter? How long does it work for, if it does work?" said Storper, who was not involved in the new study.

    "This study raises these questions by showing the improvement of cognition with remedy of hearing loss," he said. "Further investigation will help answer the remaining questions."

    The research, published March 12 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, was led by Dr. Isabelle Mosnier of Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, in France.

    Her team also found that, besides enhancing hearing, the cochlear implant seemed to boost the emotional health of at least some of the seniors. The study found that the number of patients who were free of depression rose from 59 percent before receiving a cochlear implant, to 76 percent by one year after receiving the device.

    Six months after the participants received their cochlear implants, there were also improvements in their average scores in all areas of thinking (cognitive) abilities. More than 80 percent of those with the lowest cognitive scores before receiving a cochlear implant showed improvement one year after implantation.

    Today on WebMD

    blueberries
    Eating for a longer, healthier life.
    woman biking
    How to stay vital in your 50s and beyond.
     
    womans finger tied with string
    Learn how we remember, and why we forget.
    doctor in lab
    FDA report sheds light on tests for new drugs.
     
    fast healthy snack ideas
    Article
    how healthy is your mouth
    Tool
     
    dog on couch
    Tool
    doctor holding syringe
    Slideshow
     
    champagne toast
    Slideshow
    Two women wearing white leotards back to back
    Quiz
     
    Man feeding woman
    Slideshow
    two senior women laughing
    Article