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Heart Disease and Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, is a type of progressive heart disease in which the heart is abnormally enlarged, thickened, and/or stiffened. As a result, the heart muscle's ability to pump blood is weakened, often causing heart failure and the backup of blood into the lungs or rest of the body. The disease can also cause abnormal heart rhythms.

There are three main types of cardiomyopathy:

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Potassium and Your Heart

Potassium is a nutrient with a crucial job: It enables your heart to beat. A hundred thousand times a day, potassium helps trigger your heart to squeeze blood through your body. Potassium helps your muscles to move, your nerves to work, and your kidneys to filter blood. If you have high blood pressure, heart failure, or heart rhythm problems, getting enough potassium can be especially important. Although potassium and cholesterol aren't directly related, eating a potassium-rich diet might lower...

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on February 10, 2014
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