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Heart Disease and Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, is a type of progressive heart disease in which the heart is abnormally enlarged, thickened, and/or stiffened. As a result, the heart muscle's ability to pump blood is weakened, often causing heart failure and the backup of blood into the lungs or rest of the body. The disease can also cause abnormal heart rhythms.

There are three main types of cardiomyopathy:

Recommended Related to Heart Disease

Thriving After 2 Heart Attacks

I had my first heart attack 26 years ago, when I was 52. I was very active then, sometimes jogging and often walking long distances. But I was also on the congressional staff in Washington, and the day leading up to the attack was even more hectic than usual. My boss was introducing major legislation, and I had crafted an important floor speech. I didn’t have time for regular meals and ate a huge cheeseburger for dinner, then smoked three or four cigarettes. It happened about 3 in the morning...

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on February 10, 2014
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