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Heart Disease and Cardiomyopathy

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    Cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, is a type of progressive heart disease in which the heart is abnormally enlarged, thickened, and/or stiffened. As a result, the heart muscle's ability to pump blood is weakened, often causing heart failure and the backup of blood into the lungs or rest of the body. The disease can also cause abnormal heart rhythms.

    There are three main types of cardiomyopathy:

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    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on February 10, 2014
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