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    Heart Disease and Cardiomyopathy

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    Cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, is a type of progressive heart disease in which the heart is abnormally enlarged, thickened, and/or stiffened. As a result, the heart muscle's ability to pump blood is weakened, often causing heart failure and the backup of blood into the lungs or rest of the body. The disease can also cause abnormal heart rhythms.

    There are three main types of cardiomyopathy:

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    Alcohol and Heart Disease

    Can you drink if you have heart disease? Moderate drinking should be OK, if your doctor approves, but you shouldn't count on alcohol to be a major part of your heart health plan. "If you don’t drink alcohol now, there is no reason to start,” says Mark Urman, MD, a cardiologist at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles. It's true that there have been studies linking drinking small amounts of alcohol -- no more than two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women -- to better heart health...

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    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on February 16, 2016
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