Skip to content

Heart Disease Health Center

New Viagra Study Eases Some Fears

Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Health News

May 31, 2000 -- A new study shows that Viagra appears to be safe even for some men with severe heart disease, as long as they are not taking nitroglycerine or similar drugs for their conditions.

Reports of heart attacks in several men who had used Viagra had led researchers to worry that the drug might pose a special risk to those with heart problems such as angina (chest pain). But the study, published in TheNew England Journal of Medicine, shows that the usual dose of Viagra causes no damaging changes to the heart's circulation in men with coronary artery disease (CAD).

Lead author Howard C. Herrmann, MD, tells WebMD that his findings "should provide reassurance about the safety of Viagra for patients who take it, for urologists who prescribe it to treat erectile dysfunction, and for cardiologists, who probably don't ask about erectile dysfunction as often as they should." Herrmann is professor of medicine and director of interventional cardiology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia.

Herrmann and colleagues measured Viagra's effect on blood flow to the heart and lungs in 14 men with severe coronary artery disease. CAD is a major cause of angina and heart attacks. For the study, men had to stop taking nitrate-containing drugs such as nitroglycerin, which is often used to treat angina.

All of the men in the study had CAD so severe that at least one of the major arteries supplying the heart with blood had closed up by 70 percent or more. The study was supported by Pfizer, the maker of Viagra.

Herrmann reports that careful examination of the blood flow within the arteries showed that Viagra had essentially no effect on blood flow to the heart or lungs, or on the heart's ability to pump blood.

"Our data support the consensus position of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association that Viagra is safe for patients with stable coronary artery disease who are not taking medications containing nitrates," Herrmann writes.

Rohit R. Arora, MD, who reported one of the first cases of heart attack in a patient who had taken Viagra, tells WebMD that this "well-done, meticulous, and focused" study provides useful information about Viagra's effects on the heart's circulatory system, but he would like to see more direct information about heart attacks in men taking the drug. Ahora, who is director of critical cardiac care services at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, was not involved in the study.

Today on WebMD

x-ray of human heart
A visual guide.
atrial fibrillation
Symptoms and causes.
 
heart rate graph
10 things to never do.
heart rate
Get the facts.
 
empty football helmet
Article
red wine
Video
 
eating blueberries
Article
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
 
Inside A Heart Attack
SLIDESHOW
Omega 3 Sources
SLIDESHOW
 
Salt Shockers
SLIDESHOW
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW