Skip to content

Infertility & Reproduction Health Center

Select An Article

How to Choose a Fertility Clinic

Font Size

Before you take the next step in your journey to become pregnant, it's worth seeking out a good fertility clinic.

Let's say you've been getting advice from your gynecologist, who's run a blood test for hormones or had you record your basal body temperature for a couple of months. At the same time, your husband has had his plumbing checked out by a urologist. When it comes time to diagnose where the problem may be and suggest solutions, you may wish there were a single doctor you both could see. That's where the infertility specialist comes in, providing big-picture advice. Women over age 35 or who have a history of three or more miscarriages; men with a poor semen analysis; and couples who have tried for at least two years to get pregnant, should plan on seeing a specialist, recommends Resolve, an infertility support group.

Recommended Related to Infertility & Reproduction

Your Guide to Female Infertility

Infertility is the inability to get pregnant after a year of unprotected intercourse.  About 10% of couples in the United States are affected by infertility. Both men and women can be infertile. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 1/3 of the time the diagnosis is due to female infertility, 1/3 of the time it is linked to male infertility, and the remaining cases of infertility are due to a combination of factors from both partners. For approximately 20% of couples, the cause cannot...

Read the Your Guide to Female Infertility article > >

However, you need to do some homework first. Before you step foot into the fertility clinic, find out what kind of invasive tests or procedures might lie in wait for you. And give some thought ahead of time to how far you're willing to go with this process. Advanced reproductive technology can cost many thousands of dollars, can involve strong drugs or hormones, and can be an emotional roller coaster. Knowing your limits will keep you from being talked into some nifty new procedure that you really don't want and can't afford.

When it comes to choosing a clinic, do thorough research ahead of time. One useful resource is a federal database kept by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that contains the success rates of fertility centers around the country. The statistics are updated every few years, so check the date. Keep in mind that some fertility centers that looked great several years ago may have had high staff turnover and declined in quality. But the numbers give you a place to start. Also, ask a lot of questions of every fertility clinic you're considering.

"You shouldn't look at the report and say 'Center A has the highest success rate, I'm going there,'" says Arthur Wisot, MD, an infertility specialist in Los Angeles, Calif., and author of ''Conceptions & Misconceptions,'' a book about choosing infertility care. "Just be sure they have a success rate that's at least above the national average."

We've all heard the scary stories about embryos ending up in the wrong womb or ugly legal disputes over someone's frozen eggs. To be sure you don't become the next reproductive-technology headline, check that the clinic has good quality control and strong ethics.

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Four pregnant women standing in a row
How much do you know about conception?
Couple with surrogate mother
Which one is right for you?
 
couple lying in grass holding hands
Why Dad's health matters.
couple viewing positive pregnancy test
6 ways to improve your chances.
 
Which Treatment Is Right For You
Slideshow
Conception Myths
Article
 
eddleman prepare your body pregnancy
Video
Conception
Slideshow
 
Charting Your Fertility Cycle
Article
Fertility Specialist
Article
 
Understanding Fertility Symptoms
Article
invitro fertilization
Article
 

WebMD Special Sections