Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Infertility & Reproduction Health Center

Select An Article
Font Size

Hysterosalpingogram

(continued)

Risks continued...

In rare cases, if an oil-based dye is used, the oil can leak into the blood. This can cause blockage of blood flow to a section of the lung (pulmonary embolism). Most hysterosalpingogram tests use water-based dyes.

After the test

After the test, some of the dye will leak out of the vagina. You also may have some vaginal bleeding for several days after the test. Call your doctor immediately if you have:

  • Heavy vaginal bleeding (soak more than one tampon or pad in one hour).
  • A fever.
  • Severe belly pain.
  • Vaginal bleeding that lasts for more than 3 to 4 days.

Results

A hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is an X-ray test that looks at the inside of the uteruscamera.gif and fallopian tubes and the area around them.

Hysterosalpingogram

Normal:

The shape of the uterus and fallopian tubes are normal. The fallopian tubes are not scarred or damaged. The dye flows freely from the uterus, through the fallopian tubes, and spills normally into the belly.

No objects (such as an intrauterine device, or IUD), tumors, or growths are seen in the uterus.

Abnormal:

Fallopian tubes may be scarred, malformed, or blocked so that the dye does not flow through the tubes and spill into the belly. Possible causes of blocked fallopian tubes include pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or endometriosis.

The dye may leak through the wall of the uterus, showing a tear or hole in the uterus.

An abnormal uterus may show tissue (called a septum) that divides the uterus.

Growths, such as polyps or fibroids, may be present.

What Affects the Test

Reasons you may not be able to have the test or why the results may not be helpful include:

  • If your fallopian tube has a spasm. This may make a normal fallopian tube look blocked.
  • If the doctor can't put a catheter in the uterus.

This test is not done on women who are having their period, are pregnant, or have a pelvic infection.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

female reproductive system
Article
healthtool ovulation calculator
Tool
 
Low Tech Fertility Treatment
Video
Getting Pregnant
Article
 
Which Treatment Is Right For You
Slideshow
Conception Myths
Article
 
eddleman prepare your body pregnancy
Video
Conception
Slideshow
 
Charting Your Fertility Cycle
Article
Fertility Specialist
Article
 
Understanding Fertility Symptoms
Article
invitro fertilization
Article
 

WebMD Special Sections