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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Intraocular (Eye) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatments for patients with intraocular melanoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment,patients may want to think about taking pa

  2. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

    Primary intraocular melanomas originate from melanocytes in the uveal tract.[1] Four distinct cellular types are recognized in intraocular melanoma (revised Callender classification):[2]Spindle-A cells (spindle-shaped cells with slender nuclei and lacking visible nucleoli). Spindle-B cells (spindle-shaped cells with larger nuclei and distinct nucleoli).Epithelioid cells (larger polygonal cells with one or more prominent nucleoli).Intermediate cells (similar to but smaller than epithelioid cells).Most primary intraocular melanomas contain variable proportions of epithelioid, spindle-A, and spindle-B cells (mixed-cell melanomas). Pure epithelioid-cell primary melanomas are infrequent (approximately 3% of cases).[1] In the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, mixed-cell type melanomas predominated (86% of cases).[3]References: Klintworth GK, Scroggs MW: The eye and ocular adnexa. In: Sternberg SS, ed.: Diagnostic Surgical Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999,

  3. Interventions With Inadequate Evidence as to Whether They Reduce Risk of Melanoma

    Sunscreen Use and Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Avoidance Benefits There is inadequate evidence to determine whether the avoidance of sunburns or the use of sunscreen alters the incidence of cutaneous melanoma. Magnitude of Benefit: Unknown. Study Design: Primarily cohort or case-control studies. A post-hoc analysis of one randomized controlled trial of regular sunscreen use (vs. use at the ...

  4. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Skin Cancer Screening

    Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer. Some screening tests are used because they have been shown to be helpful both in finding cancers early and in decreasing the chance of dying from these cancers. Other tests are used because they have been shown to find cancer in some people; however,it has not been proven in clinical trials that use of these tests will decrease the risk ...

  5. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Get more information on melanoma treatment. How to contact the National Cancer Institute (NCI) via phone (1-800-4-Cancer), online, or mail. Plus, details on how to search the NCI web site, and how to order NCI publications.

  6. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

  7. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    CALL 1-800-4-CANCER For more information,U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Deaf and hard-of-hearing callers with TTY equipment may call 1-800-332-8615. The call is free and a trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your ...

  8. Melanoma/Skin Cancer Clinical Trials

    WebMD offers help for finding clinical trials for those with melanoma or other types of skin cancer.

  9. Radiation Treatment for Cancer

    Radiation therapy uses high doses of radiation to destroy or shrink advanced or metastatic melanoma with little harm to nearby healthy tissue. Radiation damages the genetic material of cancer cells, stopping their growth. Treatment is usually done several times a week for up to 6 weeks. ...

  10. Changes in a Mole or Skin Growth - Topic Overview

    Moles may change over time. They may get bigger, grow a hair, become more raised, get lighter in color, or fade away. Many people develop new moles until about age 40. But some changes in moles or skin growths are caused by skin cancer.Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can prevent complications. Melanoma, a serious type of skin cancer, often begins as a change in a mole or other skin growth. These early signs are described in the ABCDE system: Asymmetry. One half doesn't match the other half.Border irregularity. The edges are ragged, notched, or blurred.Color. The color isn't uniform. Shades of tan, brown, and black are present. Dashes of red, white, and blue make the mole look blotchy.Diameter. The mole is larger than 6 mm (0.2 in.) across (about the size of a pencil eraser). Any growth of a mole should be of concern.Evolution. There is a change in the size, shape, symptoms (such as itching or tenderness), surface (especially bleeding), or color.Early detection of skin

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