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    Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

    1. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

      A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage 0 (Melanoma in Situ)Treatment of stage 0 is usually surgery to remove the area of abnormal cells and a small amount of normal tissue around it.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage 0 melanoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.Stage I MelanomaTreatment of stage I melanoma may include the following: Surgery to remove the tumor and some of the normal tissue around it. Sometimes lymph node mapping and removal of lymph nodes is also done.A clinical trial of new

    2. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of melanoma. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in which

    3. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062802-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Skin Cancer Prevention

    4. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062916-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Intraocular (Eye) Melanoma Treatment

    5. Skin Cancer Treatment

      Learn more about various skin cancer treatment options from the experts at WebMD.

    6. Understanding Skin Cancer -- Prevention

      Reducing your exposure to harmful sunlight and checking your skin are key to preventing skin cancer. Learn more from WebMD.

    7. Understanding Skin Cancer -- Symptoms

      Learn more from WebMD about the symptoms of skin cancer.

    8. Skin Cancer, Non Melanoma Guide - Surgery

      Surgery is the most common and most successful method of treating nonmelanoma skin cancer. The goals of surgery are to: Remove the entire skin cancer and a margin of healthy skin tissue around the cancer to reduce the chance of recurrence.

    9. Skin Cancer, Non Melanoma Guide - When To Call a Doctor

      Call your health professional if you have an irritated or irregular skin growth.

    10. Cause

      The most common causes of melanoma are: Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. and exposure at high altitudes. Damage to the DNA of melanocytes from exposure to the sun and its UV light radiation is the single most

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