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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Changes to This Summary (05 / 24 / 2012)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  2. Stages of Skin Cancer

    After nonmelanoma skin cancer has been diagnosed,tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the skin or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the skin or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order .

  3. Recurrent Melanoma

    Recurrent melanoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the original site or in other parts of the body,such as the lungs or liver. ...

  4. Ciliary Body Melanoma

    Note: Some citations in the text of this section are followed by a level of evidence. The PDQ editorial boards use a formal ranking system to help the reader judge the strength of evidence linked to the reported results of a therapeutic strategy. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Levels of Evidence for more information.) Melanoma involving the ciliary body is a rare tumor that carries a poor ...

  5. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Basal Cell Carcinoma Treatment of basal cell carcinoma may include the following: Mohs micrographic surgery. Simple excision. Electrodesiccation and curettage. Cryosurgery. Radiation therapy. Laser surgery. Topical chemotherapy with fluorouracil. Photodynamic therapy. A clinical trial of biologic therapy. Follow-up skin exams are important for people with basal cell carcinoma because ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview

    Role of ObservationIris melanomas have relatively good outcomes with a 5-year survival rate of more than 95%. They are predominantly of the spindle-cell type and are usually smaller in size than posterior melanomas because of earlier detection. Conservative management is generally advocated whenever possible, but surgical intervention may be justified with unequivocal tumor growth or with extensive disease at initial examination.The management of small choroidal melanomas is controversial, and it is not clear whether treatment of small tumors prevents metastasis.[1] The natural history of small choroidal melanoma is poorly understood. Small, pigmented, choroidal lesions cannot always be differentiated reliably on examination. Growth is a presumed indicator of malignant potential.[2] The likelihood of progression from the time of diagnosis to the time when tumor growth warrants treatment has not been well characterized. Some ophthalmologists advocate

  7. Changes to This Summary (03 / 01 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Description of the EvidenceAdded American Cancer Society as reference 4.Updated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  8. Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary,please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form.

  9. Medium and Large Choroidal Melanoma

    Note: Some citations in the text of this section are followed by a level of evidence. The PDQ editorial boards use a formal ranking system to help the reader judge the strength of evidence linked to the reported results of a therapeutic strategy. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Levels of Evidence for more information.) Enucleation remains the standard therapy for most large choroidal melanomas and

  10. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Screening tests have risks. Decisions about screening tests can be difficult. Not all screening tests are helpful and most have risks. Before having any screening test,you may want to discuss the test with your doctor. It is important to know the risks of the test and whether it has been proven to reduce the risk of dying from cancer. The risks of melanoma screening tests include the ...

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