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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Exams and Tests

    A physical exam of skin is used to evaluate the skin for melanoma. If melanoma is suspected, a skin biopsy will be done. For this, your health professional will remove a sample of skin tissue and send it to a pathologist to be examined under a microscope.

  2. Medications

    Interferon given before or after surgery is standard treatment for melanoma that has spread to the lymph nodes. The use of interferon may increase the survival rate of some people with stage III melanoma. Melanoma that has spread to distant sites is rarel

  3. Cause

    The most common causes of melanoma are: Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. and exposure at high altitudes. Damage to the DNA of melanocytes from exposure to the sun and its UV light radiation is the single most

  4. Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition such as skin cancer-melanoma.

  5. Melanoma/Skin Cancer Clinical Trials

    WebMD offers help for finding clinical trials for those with melanoma or other types of skin cancer.

  6. Radiation Treatment for Cancer

    Radiation therapy uses high doses of radiation to destroy or shrink advanced or metastatic melanoma with little harm to nearby healthy tissue. Radiation damages the genetic material of cancer cells, stopping their growth. Treatment is usually done several times a week for up to 6 weeks. ...

  7. Changes in a Mole or Skin Growth - Topic Overview

    Moles may change over time. They may get bigger, grow a hair, become more raised, get lighter in color, or fade away. Many people develop new moles until about age 40. But some changes in moles or skin growths are caused by skin cancer.Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can prevent complications. Melanoma, a serious type of skin cancer, often begins as a change in a mole or other skin growth. These early signs are described in the ABCDE system: Asymmetry. One half doesn't match the other half.Border irregularity. The edges are ragged, notched, or blurred.Color. The color isn't uniform. Shades of tan, brown, and black are present. Dashes of red, white, and blue make the mole look blotchy.Diameter. The mole is larger than 6 mm (0.2 in.) across (about the size of a pencil eraser). Any growth of a mole should be of concern.Evolution. There is a change in the size, shape, symptoms (such as itching or tenderness), surface (especially bleeding), or color.Early detection of skin

  8. Metastatic Melanoma - Topic Overview

    When melanoma spreads (metastasizes),it usually spreads first into nearby lymph nodes. It can also spread through the bloodstream. Distant metastases of melanoma typically are found in the skin,liver,lungs,bone,and brain. If the primary melanoma is on a leg or arm,metastases usually are first found higher up on that leg or arm. Unusual sites for metastases include the eye. Most deaths ...

  9. Surgical Excision of Melanoma

    Surgery to remove (excise) a melanoma removes the entire melanoma along with a border (margin) of normal - appearing skin. The width of the border of normal skin removed depends on the depth of the melanoma.

  10. Skin Cancer Screening - Topic Overview

    Skin cancer can be cured if found and treated early.Your doctor may check your skin once a year during your annual exam. Or your doctor may suggest a skin exam more often, especially if you have: Familial atypical mole and melanoma (FAM-M) syndrome. This is an inherited tendency to develop melanoma. Examine your skin every month and be examined by a doctor every 4 to 6 months, preferably by the same doctor each time.Increased occupational or recreational exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.Abnormal moles called atypical moles (dysplastic nevi). These moles are not cancerous, but their presence is a warning of an inherited tendency to develop melanoma.After reviewing evidence from studies, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has not recommended for or against routine skin cancer screening for adults at normal risk.1Get to know your skinSkin self-exam is a good way to detect early skin changes that may mean melanoma. Look for any abnormal skin growth or any change in the

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