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    Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

    1. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about skin cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in which

    2. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment

      Incidence and MortalityMelanoma of the uveal tract (iris, ciliary body, and choroid), though rare, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. The mean age-adjusted incidence of uveal melanoma in the United States is approximately 4.3 new cases per million population, with no clear variation by latitude. Males have a higher incidence than females (4.9 vs. 3.7 per million).[1] The age-adjusted incidence of this cancer has remained stable since at least the early 1970s.[1,2] U.S. incidence rates are low compared with the rates of other reporting countries, which vary from about 5.3 to 10.9 cases per million. Some of the variation may be the result of differences in inclusion criteria and methods of calculation.[1]Uveal melanoma is diagnosed mostly at older ages, with a progressively rising, age-specific, incidence rate that peaks near the age of 70 years.[3] Host susceptibility factors associated with the development of this cancer include:[2,3,4]Caucasian race.Light

    3. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (05 / 31 / 2013)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

    4. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258015-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Intraocular (Eye) Melanoma Treatment

    5. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062750-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Skin Cancer Screening

    6. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Cellular and Molecular Classification of Melanoma

      Following is a list of clinicopathologic cellular subtypes of malignant melanoma. These should be considered descriptive terms of historic interest only as they do not have independent prognostic or therapeutic significance. Superficial spreading.Nodular.Lentigo maligna.Acral lentiginous (palmar/plantar and subungual).Miscellaneous unusual types: Mucosal lentiginous (oral and genital).Desmoplastic.Verrucous. Identification of activating mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway has led to the definition of molecular subtypes of melanoma and provided potential drug targets.BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) gene, first reported in 2002, are the most frequent mutation in cutaneous melanoma. Approximately 40% to 60% of malignant melanomas harbor a single nucleotide transversion. The majority have a mutation that results in a substitution from valine to glutamic acid at position 600 BRAF (V600E); less frequent mutations include valine 600 to lysine or

    7. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Unresectable Stage III, Stage IV, and Recurrent Melanoma Treatment

      Stage IV melanoma is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]Any T, any N, M1Treatment Options for Patients With Stage IV and Recurrent MelanomaImmunotherapy.Checkpoint inhibitors.Interleukin-2 (IL-2).Signal transduction inhibitors.BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) inhibitors (for patients who test positive for the BRAF V600 mutation).MEK inhibitors.Multikinase inhibitors.KIT inhibitors.Chemotherapy.Palliative local therapy.Clinical trials should be strongly considered because of the rapid advances in the development of novel agents and combinations of agents designed to reverse or interrupt aberrant molecular pathways that support tumor growth.Treatment option overview for patients with stage IV and recurrent melanomaAlthough melanoma that has spread to distant sites is rarely curable, two approaches have demonstrated clinical benefit by prolonging overall survival (OS) in randomized trials:

    8. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Skin Cancer

      Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin.The skin is the body's largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (upper or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer). The epidermis is made up of 3 kinds of cells:Squamous cells are the thin, flat cells that make up most of the epidermis.Basal cells are the round cells under the squamous cells.Melanocytes are found throughout the lower part of the epidermis. They make melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun, melanocytes make more pigment, causing the skin to tan, or darken.The dermis contains blood and lymph vessels, hair follicles, and glands. Anatomy of the skin, showing the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Melanocytes are in the layer of basal

    9. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of intraocular melanoma. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process

    10. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 25 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

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