0 0
  • Question 1/11

    Guys’ skin is oilier than women’s, so they don’t need body lotion.

  • Answer 1/11

    Guys’ skin is oilier than women’s, so they don’t need body lotion.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Men do tend to have oilier skin than women, but your body has fewer oil glands than your face. Everyone requires extra moisture sometimes to avoid patches of scaly or ashy skin.

     

    For the body, thick creams are better than thin lotions. If your face is sometimes dry, look for a facial cream that is labeled oil free.

  • Question 1/11

    Men seem to have more blackheads around their noses than women because

  • Answer 1/11

    Men seem to have more blackheads around their noses than women because

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Both men and women tend to get blackheads in the pores around their noses, but guys often leave them there.

     

    Dermatologists say that when women see a pimple or clogged pore, they tend to get rid of it.

     

    Squeezing pimples isn’t a good idea since it can leave scars and cause more breakouts. Salicylic acid in a wash, scrub, or leave-on product can remove oil and dead skin that cause blackheads and make them more obvious.

     

    Sticky strips that pull clogs from pores also can help clear blackheads safely.

  • Question 1/11

    Men are more likely than women to get zits on their…

  • Answer 1/11

    Men are more likely than women to get zits on their…

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You usually think of back breakouts as a guy thing, but both men and women get zits on their backs. Sweating can make it worse.

     

    One good way to treat back acne is to use a loofah for light scrubbing in the shower to get rid of dead skin cells.

     

    Using a body wash or cleanser with pimple-fighting glycolic or salicylic acid can help even more. So can treating pimples with an over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide product.

  • Question 1/11

    Most moisturizers are made for women, so men shouldn’t use them.

  • Answer 1/11

    Most moisturizers are made for women, so men shouldn’t use them.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Moisturizers and wrinkle creams are made for men and women alike. Doctors say keeping skin moist is important for everyone.

     

    Because men tend to have oilier skin than women, a light gel or serum for daily use may be better than a heavy cream or lotion.

     

    To treat wrinkles and fine lines, look for an anti-aging product that contains retinol.

  • Question 1/11

    Having ashy or scaly elbows and knees is just part of being a man.

  • Answer 1/11

    Having ashy or scaly elbows and knees is just part of being a man.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Guys are more likely to have ashy or scaly elbows and knees than women, but it’s because they don’t use lotion as often and their skin gets dried out, not because they’re men.

  • Question 1/11

    If you have an indoor job, you don’t need to wear sunscreen every day.

  • Answer 1/11

    If you have an indoor job, you don’t need to wear sunscreen every day.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many doctors say that everyone should wear sunscreen daily. Even five minutes of sun exposure every day adds up. You don’t need the stuff you’d use for a day at the beach. For everyday protection, check out regular facial moisturizers. Some have SPF built in.

     

    For long days outdoors, use a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and reapply every two hours.

  • Answer 1/11

    Shaving is good for your face because it

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Shaving gets rid of dead cells that make skin look older and dull, and that clog pores, leading to breakouts.

     

    Some doctors think that this daily removal of dead cells helps explain why men's skin ages more slowly than women's.

  • Answer 1/11

    After shaving, a man should always

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many aftershaves contain alcohol, which can remove any germs around cuts, as well as dirt and oil. But alcohol can also dry and irritate the skin. Use a light moisturizer or a moisturizing aftershave lotion to help soothe skin and reduce razor burn.

  • Question 1/11

    The right shaving products can make your beard feel softer.

  • Answer 1/11

    The right shaving products can make your beard feel softer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you have a super-rough beard, the one thing that will make your beard seem softer to the touch is to grow it longer. Shorter hair, such as stubble, is not as flexible as longer hair, so it feels rougher.

  • Answer 1/11

    Men can avoid razor bumps by

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    After a hot shower, your beard is softer and easier to cut. A multi-blade razor with spring-mounted blades and a moisturizing strip will adjust to the curves of the cheeks and jaw so you're less likely to pull or nick your skin.

     

    It may also help to use a shaving gel instead of soap or plain shaving foam, and to replace the blade often.

  • Question 1/11

    Getting a professional shave once in a while is another way to help reduce razor bumps.

  • Answer 1/11

    Getting a professional shave once in a while is another way to help reduce razor bumps.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A professional hot-towel shave at a salon or barbershop feels great, but it’s a luxury, not a need. It’s not likely to help your skin improve or reduce razor bumps.

  • Your Score:

    0
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You know how to keep your skin healthy and looking great.

    Results:

    It’s OK. You’ve got some good skin habits, but no one’s perfect.

    Results:

    Chances are your skin may need a little help -- busting these myths is a great first step.

    Share your score
    Next
    Next Quiz:

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Myths and Facts

    Retake Quiz

Sources | Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD on June 30, 2016 Medically Reviewed on June 30, 2016

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD on
June 30, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Michele Constantini / PhotoAlto Agency RF Collections

SOURCES:

Debra Jaliman, MD, dermatologist at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, author of Skin Rules.

Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.