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Excuse No. 4: I don’t have time to floss.

Find a time of day that works for you. You should floss at least once a day. Two times is best.

Make it a part of your routine, morning and night. If you find that you forget, store your floss with your toothbrush and toothpaste as a reminder.

Keep in mind that you don’t have to do it in front of your bathroom mirror. Keep some floss in your car to use while you’re in traffic. Stash some in your desk and use it after lunch. The key is to fit in flossing when it works for you.

Excuse No. 5: It hurts when I floss.

If your gums bleed or hurt, you may have gingivitis or gum disease. That’s an even bigger reason to floss.

“Flossing should not be a painful experience, but stopping flossing because of bleeding (or pain) is just the opposite of what you should be doing,” says Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD. He's chairman of the department of cardiology and preventive medicine at New York University School of Dentistry.

If you brush and floss daily, the bleeding and pain should stop in less than 2 weeks. If it doesn’t, see your dentist.

Excuse No. 6: I’m pregnant.

It may be hard to floss if you’re tired or nauseated. But it’s important to keep up with your oral health routine. Pregnancy can cause a wide range of dental issues, from gum disease to enamel wear.

Excuse No. 7: My teeth are too close together.

Try waxed or glide floss for an easier fit. If you have recessed gums, varied gaps between teeth, or braces, you can also try a threader or loop to find an easier entry point. If your floss shreds, you may have a cavity or a problem with dental work, like a broken crown or loose filling. Tell your dentist to take a look.