Skip to content

Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer: Help Your Doctor Understand Your Preferences

Getting diagnosed with ovarian cancer is scary, but it is a treatable disease. However, there isn't a one-size-fits-all approach to ovarian cancer treatment. Talk to your oncologist to determine what will work best for you.

Because there is a lot of information to absorb, it may be overwhelming in the beginning. Write down your questions before your appointment (see our printable checklist) and ask the most pressing questions first so that you don't run out of time during your preliminary visit.

Recommended Related to Ovarian Cancer

Stage III and Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment

Treatment options for patients with all stages of ovarian epithelial cancer have consisted of surgery followed by chemotherapy. Surgery Patients diagnosed with stage III and stage IV disease are treated with surgery and chemotherapy; however, the outcome is generally less favorable for patients with stage IV disease. The role of surgery for patients with stage IV disease is unclear, but in most instances, the bulk of the disease is intra-abdominal, and surgical procedures similar to those...

Read the Stage III and Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment article > >

Covering the Basics of Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy, which uses drugs to kill cancer cells, is usually recommended after surgery to treat most stages of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is typically responsive to chemotherapy. 

There are different ways to administer chemotherapy, such as by mouth or injections into the muscle. Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer is usually given intravenously (IV) -- into a vein -- or medications are injected through a catheter or port into your abdomen, called intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IP). 

Ask your doctor whether you are a candidate for IP. Research shows that women who received both IV and IP chemotherapy are disease-free longer than women who received only IV chemotherapy (and have a higher survival rate), but they also experienced more severe side effects such as fatigue, pain, and low blood counts.

A central line, also called central venous catheter (CVC), may be administered prior to chemotherapy treatment. A CVC is a hollow tube that is placed in a large vein, and it can stay in the body for a much longer period of time. CVCs allow an easier route for IV medicines and require different levels of care. The type of CVC used is based on how long you will be getting treatment, how long it takes to infuse each dose of chemotherapy, your preferences, your doctor's preferences, the care required to maintain the CVC, and its cost. Talk to your doctor about the type of central line that he or she recommends for you.

Discussing Your Treatment Plan

You will likely receive a combination of chemotherapy drugs. Most oncologists in the U.S. consider combination chemotherapy more effective than a single drug in treating ovarian cancer.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Ovarian cancer illustration
What are the symptoms?
doctory with x-ray
Get to know the Symptoms.
 
cancer cell
HPV is the top cause. Find out more.
Lung cancer xray
See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
 
Integrative Medicine Cancer Quiz
QUIZ
Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
Screening Tests for Women
Slideshow
Graphic of ovaries within reproductive system
VIDEO
 
Ovarian Cancer Marker
VIDEO
Pets Improve Your Health
SLIDESHOW
 
Vitamin D
SLIDESHOW
Healthy meal with salmon
Article