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Health & Baby

Get Your Body Back After Pregnancy

Dedication and patience are key to losing postpartum baby weight and looking like your pre-baby self again.
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When to Begin

Although most women say that diet is the quickest way to lose weight after giving birth, experts say a dramatic cut in calories is not the best way to begin - particularly if you are breastfeeding.

"You should be eating at least 1,800-2,000 calories a day while breastfeeding, and if you eat less you will not only be shortchanging yourself, you'll be shortchanging your baby. You can't produce quality milk if you are not eating enough," says nutritionist Elizabeth Somer, RD, author of Nutrition for a Healthy Pregnancy.

Riley says she frequently advises patients to not even think about dieting until after their first six-week visit.

"If you can lose a couple of pounds before then, that's OK, but you really don't want to cut your food intake dramatically during these early weeks. You need the energy, and you need the calories for breastfeeding," she says.

Good news: Breastfeeding burns calories. It can help mothers lose extra weight gained during pregnancy.

But what if you're not breastfeeding? Somer says it's OK to watch your caloric intake, but never aim to lose more than a pound a week.

"Pregnancy is not unlike running a marathon every day for nine months. You have really put your body through the ringer. So even if you ate well, several nutrients are still likely to be compromised. You need this postpartum time to restore your nutritional status and your energy," she says.

After Pregnancy: Working Off the Pounds

While postpartum dieting may be off-limits for awhile, exercise is highly recommended. Experts say it can not only help you get your body back, but also increase energy and may even reduce risks of postpartum depression.

In a paper published in the Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health, experts reported mounting evidence suggesting that exercise not only benefits depressive symptoms in general but pointed to two studies indicating it may offer benefits specifically for women with postpartum depression.

To this end, many groups, including American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, have not only significantly loosened the reins on the number of activities a new mom can safely do but have also begun promoting exercise as a key factor in the health of new moms.

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