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9 Ways to Wean a Child off Thumb Sucking

Your preschooler won't stop sucking his thumb? Help your child kick the habit for good.

How to Curb the Sucking

When your child reaches the preschool age, it might be tempting to pop his thumb out of his mouth every time he starts to suck, especially if you think it might be affecting the growth and development of his teeth and jaw. But you may want to consider resisting that urge and use a different strategy.

"This is a self-soothing activity," family psychologist Jenn Berman says. "It is important to remember that you will not have a child who is going off to college sucking his thumb. It will eventually come to an end."

Adults don't realize how anxiety-provoking growing up is for children, and sucking their thumbs or fingers is a soothing activity that can help reduce their anxiety, Berman says. So if your child is approaching preschool and still sucking away, here's how to handle it correctly:

  1. DO try to limit the time that your child sucks his thumb to his bedroom or in the house, not in public, Berman says. Explain to him that this is a bed activity during nap time and at night. 
  2. DON'T turn it into a confrontation. "Don't tell your child, ‘You cannot suck your thumb anymore,'" Anderson says. "Try to recognize him and praise him when he's not sucking his thumb instead of criticizing when he is."
  3. DO talk to your child about her thumb sucking or finger sucking. "Help your child understand that when she is ready to stop, you will be there to help," Berman says. "She will eventually come to you and tell you, ‘Mommy, I don't want to suck my thumb anymore,' because you've empowered her to get there." 
  4. DON'T prohibit your child if he tries to suck his thumb or fingers after being hurt or injured. "He needs to be in his comfort zone, and by not letting him go there, you're only traumatizing him more," Berman says. 
  5. DO practice self-awareness with your child. "When your child is sucking his thumb, ask him, ‘Do you know you are sucking your thumb now?'" Hayes says. "If he says no, help him recognize that, and find another way to soothe him if he needs it, like a blanket or stuffed animal." 
  6. DON'T use the nasty-tasting stuff that is marketed to stop thumb sucking and finger sucking. "It's just cruel," Berman says. "It's pulling the rug out from under your child and that's not fair." 
  7. DO come up with creative ways to help your child understand that he is growing up and one day won't suck his thumb anymore. "Ask your child, ‘Do you think Bob the Builder sucks his thumb?'" Hayes says. "Then they'll think about, and start to process whether they want to be sucking their thumbs anymore."
  8. DON'T try a glove or a mitten on the hand as a quick-fix to thumb or finger sucking. "This will just frustrate them and cause more anxiety," Anderson says. "Likely, they're old enough to just take it off, and as a result, they'll just want to suck more." 
  9. DO remember that a child will grow out of the need for thumb sucking or finger sucking when he's good and ready. "While parents may not like it, it's best left alone," Berman says. "Kids will eventually give it up."

 

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Reviewed on December 02, 2012

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