Skip to content
    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Topic Overview

    A blood test called a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is the most common way to check for prostate cancer. A higher level of PSA may mean that you have prostate cancer or that your prostate cancer has come back.

    Your doctor also may do a biopsy. In this test, your doctor takes samples of tissue from your prostate gland or from the area where the cancer may have spread and sends the samples to a lab for testing. A biopsy is the only way to know for sure that you have prostate cancer.

    If you have had prostate cancer before, your doctor may also order a bone scan, CT scan, or MRI to see if it has come back or spread.

    Learning that you have cancer that has spread or come back can be very hard. Some people find that it helps to talk about their feelings with their family and friends. You may also want to talk with your doctor or with other people who have had this kind of cancer. Your local American Cancer Society chapter can help you find a support group.

    Your treatment choices depend on your overall health, how fast the cancer is growing, and how far it has spread.

    Locally advanced prostate cancer may be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, or a combination of these.

    Treatment of metastatic cancer focuses on slowing the spread of the cancer and relieving symptoms, such as bone pain. It also can help you feel better and live longer. Treatment may include hormone therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or immunotherapy.

    In some cases, men may be able to wait before starting treatment (active surveillance). But older men with other serious health problems may decide not to have treatment except for what is needed to treat any symptoms (watchful waiting).

    Learning about prostate cancer:

    Being diagnosed:

    Getting treatment:

    Ongoing concerns:

    Living with prostate cancer:

    End-of-life issues:

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: November 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
    1 | 2
    1 | 2
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    man with doctor
    Symptoms, risks, treatments
    man coughing
    Men shouldn’t ignore
     
    prostate cancer cells
    What does this diagnosis mean?
    doctor and male patient
    Is it worth it?
     
    cancer fighting foods
    SLIDESHOW
    15 Cancer Symptoms Men Ignore
    FEATURE
     
    Prostate Enlarged
    VIDEO
    Picture Of The Prostate
    ANATOMY
     
    Prostate Cancer Quiz
    QUIZ
    screening tests for men
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Prostate Cancer Symptoms
    VIDEO
    Vitamin D
    SLIDESHOW