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Humira (adalimumab)

 How you take it: by injection

How often you take it: once every two weeks

Most common side effects: colds, sinus infection, headache, and rash

Your doctor should:

  • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
  • Monitor you for tuberculosis or other infections while you're taking it.

How it works: Doctors call this type of a drug a "TNF blocker" since it targets tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation.

Kineret (anakinra)

How you take it: by injection

How often you take it: daily

Most common side effects: Pain or skin reactions in the area where you get the shot (cases are mild), colds, headache, and nausea.

Your doctor should:

  • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
  • Monitor you for tuberculosis or other infection while you're taking it.

How it works: Doctors call this type of drug an "IL-1 blocker" because it targets interleukin-1, a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation.

Orencia (abatacept)

How you take it: by injection or infusion

How often you take it: Depends on whether you're taking it by infusion or by injection. Both are available. Injections are given weekly while infusions are given monthly.

Most common side effects: headache, cold, sore throat, and dizziness.

Your doctor should:

  • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
  • Monitor you for tuberculosis or other infections while you're taking it.

How it works: It reduces inflammation by blocking activity of immune system cells called T cells.

Remicade (infliximab)

How you take it:  by infusion

How often you take it:  Your doctor will decide on the dose and how often you should take it.

Most common side effects: respiratory infections (such as sinus infections and sore throat), headache, coughing, stomach pain.

Your doctor should:

  • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
  • Monitor you for tubercuolsis or other infection while you're taking it.

How it works: Doctors call this type of a drug a "TNF blocker" since it targets tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation.