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Medical Reference Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Adult Treatments That May Be Used in Children - Topic Overview

    Children who have severe and persistent juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA),during or even after treatment,may be considered for therapies that have been proved to be safe and effective for adult rheumatoid arthritis or other autoimmune disease but have yet to be fully studied for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Examples of such therapies include: Cyclosporine A. This is a cytotoxic medicine,...

  2. Cyclophosphamide for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Drug details for Cyclophosphamide for rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Sulfasalazine for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Drug details for Sulfasalazine for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Minocycline for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Drug details for Minocycline for rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: School Partners - Topic Overview

    Your child's teachers,school nurse,cafeteria staff,and physical education teachers can become helpful partners as your child copes with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)) at school. If you can,meet with your child's teachers and help them learn about JIA. Work with them to develop creative ways of dealing with your child's limitations and making the best of his or her abilities. If your ...

  6. Comparing Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis - Topic Overview

    Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are different types of arthritis. Although they share some similar characteristics,each has different symptoms and requires different treatment. Therefore,an accurate diagnosis is important. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis affects about one-tenth as many people as osteoarthritis. The main difference between ...

  7. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Serial Casting - Topic Overview

    Some children who have developed mild to moderate contractures (knees,ankles,wrists,fingers,elbows) may benefit from serial casting. Serial casting is a temporary straightening and casting of the affected joint (for about 2 days). The cast is then removed,the child goes through some physical therapy,and a new cast is applied with the joint stretched a bit more. The procedure is repeated ...

  8. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Inflammatory Eye Disease - Topic Overview

    Inflammatory eye disease ( uveitis ) can develop as a complication in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Children and adults with JIA can develop cataracts,glaucoma,corneal degeneration (band keratopathy),or vision loss. The incidence of eye disease in children with JIA is from 2% to 34%. 1 Eye disease associated with JIA often has no symptoms,although blurred vision may ...

  9. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Range-of-Motion Exercises - Topic Overview

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) must do regular range-of-motion exercises to prevent contractures and to maintain joint range and flexibility. If your child is 4 years old or younger,an adult will need to move the child's joints through the range-of-motion exercises. This is called passive range of motion. The adult will gently move the joints from a bent position to a ...

  10. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Pain Management - Topic Overview

    Most children who have juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) will have some pain and discomfort from the disease. The pain of JIA is related to the type and severity of the disease, the child's pain threshold, and emotional and psychological factors. Pain limits a child's ability to function. With care and good communication with your child's doctor, it is possible to provide some, if not total, relief.How to know if your child is in painPain can be difficult for a child to describe. Also, a child isn't always able to recognize a sensation as pain. An older child may be able to describe tingling, cramping, or sharp sensations and may be able to tell where and when the sensation occurs. When a young child is in pain, the signs can be hard to recognize.Signs that may mean your child is in pain include:Changes in usual behavior. Your child may eat less or become fussy or restless. Crying, grunting, or breath-holding. Crying that can't be comforted. Facial expressions, such as a furrowed

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