Skip to content

News and Features Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. Is Your Surgeon Qualified to Perform Endoscopic Surgery?

    Not every surgeon can perform endoscopic surgery. To help you learn what to look for, we turned to some top minimally invasive surgeons. What would they ask a surgeon if they were patients? Here's what they said. What are the surgeon's credentials? "You need to ask why a surgeon is qualified," says

    Read Full Article
  2. FDA OKs 2 New Uses for Arthritis Drug Humira

    Oct. 5, 2005 - The FDA has approved two new uses for the arthritis drug Humira. The drug, which was previously approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis in 2002, is now also approved to treat psoriatic arthritis, a form of arthritis that arises in people with the skin condition psoriasis. The FDA also

    Read Full Article
  3. Motor Oil Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Sept. 23, 2005 -- People who work with mineral oils, such as motor oil and hydraulic oil, may be more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis. A new study shows that men who had occupational exposure to mineral oils had a 30% higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis. Researchers say rheumatoid arthritis i

    Read Full Article
  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Improve Function

    Sept. 14, 2005 -- The experimental rheumatoid arthritis drug Orencia is safe and effective, researchers report in The New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers show that Orencia offered pain relief and increased movement in arthritis patients who had exhausted other treatment options. "This d

    Read Full Article
  5. Taking NSAIDs? Protect Your Tummy

    Nearly every arthritis sufferer has taken a traditional painkiller like aspirin or Aleve. They are a great solution for relieving pain and inflammation, but there's a definite downside. These drugs often lead to more trouble including upset stomach and bleeding ulcers. There are some 20 traditional

    Read Full Article
  6. Methotrexate Still Best for Juvenile RA

    April 20, 2005 -- Methotrexate still appears to be best for treating juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, but a newer medication, Arava, is a very good second choice. In an international study involving kids and teens with a particularly severe form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, almost 90% showed sign

    Read Full Article
  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Tied to Skin Problems

    April 4, 2005 -- Dutch researchers have linked a group of rheumatoid arthritis drugs to skin problems. Humira (adalimumab), Remicade (infliximab), and Enbrel (etanercept) are mentioned in the study, which appears in the journal Arthritis Research and Therapy. All of those medications are biologic tr

    Read Full Article
  8. Growing Pains: When Should Parents Worry?

    Like mumps and measles, growing pains are a rite of passage, a sign of growing up. Most parents take it in stride. "It's just growing pains," they tell their crying child. But what exactly are these pains? Why do some kids get severe pain, while others get none? Could the pain mean something is real

    Read Full Article
  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Raises Heart Failure Risk

    Feb. 3, 2005 -- Rheumatoid arthritis is a significant risk factor for heart failure. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic find that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) doubles the risk of heart failure. Their report is in February's Arthritis & Rheumatism. In heart failure, the heart muscle doesn't pump as much blo

    Read Full Article
  10. Expensive Meds Best for Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Jan. 10, 2005 -- Newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients may get the most benefit from effective but high-priced medications, a British study shows. An autoimmune disease, RA is a leading cause of disability. It involves inflammation of joints and surrounding tissues. Over time, rheumatoi

    Read Full Article
Displaying 181 - 190 of 244 Articles << Prev Page 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Next >>

Today on WebMD

rubbing hands
Avoid these 6 common mistakes.
mature couple exercising
Decrease pain, increase energy.
mature woman threading needle
How much do you know?
Swelling, fatigue, pain, and more.
Lucille Ball
Hand bones X-ray
prescription pills
Woman massaging her neck
woman roasting vegetables in oven
Woman rubbing shoulder
Working out with light weights