Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Skin Problems & Treatments

  1. Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles)

    Dysplastic nevi are moles that are larger than average (larger than a pencil eraser) and irregular in shape. They tend to have uneven color with dark brown centers and lighter, uneven edges.

  2. Infectious Mononucleosis

    Infectious mononucleosis. Marked white exudate on the tonsils of a child with infectious mononucleosis.

  3. Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles) Close-Up

    Dysplastic nevi are moles that are larger than average (larger than a pencil eraser) and irregular in shape. They tend to have uneven color with dark brown centers and lighter, uneven edges.

  4. Nevus Depigmentosus

    Nevus depigmentosus. Depigmented area on the cheek of an infant present since birth.

  5. Angiokeratoma Circumscriptum

    Angiokeratoma circumscriptum. This vascular ectasia may be present at birth but has been reported to develop in childhood and even adulthood. There is a higher incidence in females. Lesions are most commonly found on the lower extremities but may be found elsewhere. Lesions consist of small nodules or larger plaques characterized by a dark red to purple color and a warty, hyperkeratotic scale sometimes in a linear distribution. These lesions may bleed when traumatized.

  6. Phytophotodermatitis

    Phytophotodermatitis. In addition to perfumes, a number of plants, grasses, fruits, and vegetables contain psoralen as a photosensitizer. The child who helps mother or father slice limes before a trip to the park may develop an identical eruption on the hands. Celery and parsley may present similar problems. It is important to recognize this entity since some affected infants and children have been mistakenly thought to have bruising from child abuse.

  7. Palmoplantar Pustulosis

    Palmoplantar pustulosis, palms and soles. Deep-seated yellow vesicles on the palms which progress to crusts and scales.

  8. Hand Foot Mouth Disease in Mouth

    Hand-foot-mouth disease. This common and benign viral disease of childhood is usually caused by the A16 strain of coxsackievirus, although other strains of the same virus have been implicated. It most often occurs in late summer and early fall. The prodrome consists of low-grade fever and malaise. Shortly thereafter, vesicular lesions arise on the soft palate, tongue, buccal mucosa, and uvula. The lips are usually spared. Occasionally, these lesions may be painful and cause some difficulty in eating. The cutaneous lesions develop 1 or 2 days after those in the mouth. They consist of asymptomatic round or oval vesiculopustules that evolve into superficial erosions. The edges of the palms and soles are a favored location.

  9. Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. Well-demarcated yellow-orange plaques on the bilateralshins of a young female diabetic patient.

  10. Tuberous Sclerosis (Periungual Fibroma)

    Tuberous sclerosis, periungual fibroma. Flesh-colored periungual papule appearing in adolescence in an individual with tuberous sclerosis.

Displaying 141 - 150 of 1031 Articles << Prev Page 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next >>

Today on WebMD

chafing
Pictures and symptoms of the red, scaly rash.
woman with dyed dark hair
What it says about your health.
 
woman with cleaning products
Top causes of the itch that rashes.
atopic dermatitus
Identify and treat common skin problems.
 
itchy skin
Article
shingles rash on skin
Article
 
woman with skin tag
Quiz
Woman washing face
Video
 
woman washing her hair in sink
Video
close up of womans bare neck
Tools
 
Feet
Slideshow
woman with face cream
Quiz