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Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

Varicose Veins - Surgery

Surgery for varicose veins includes tying off (ligation) and removing (stripping) larger veins. Surgery may be used to treat varicose veins if:

  • The varicose veins have not responded to home treatment and your symptoms are bothering you.
  • You are concerned about the way varicose veins look, and laser treatment, radiofrequency treatment, or sclerotherapy is not likely to improve their appearance to your satisfaction.
Varicose Veins: Should I Have a Surgical Procedure?

Less invasive procedures are another option to treat varicose veins. Less invasive procedures are more commonly done than surgery. These procedures can give good results with less risk than surgery. These procedures include laser treatment (including endovenous laser); phlebectomy, or stab avulsion; and radiofrequency treatment.

What to think about

Some people may want to have surgery to improve how their legs look, even though their varicose veins are not causing other problems. Surgery may be appropriate in some cases as long as you don't have other health problems that make the treatment risky.

Keep in mind that surgery for varicose veins done only for cosmetic reasons (that is, not medically necessary) is usually not covered by insurance.

In some cases, a combination of surgery and sclerotherapy may be used to treat varicose veins. Sclerotherapy is a nonsurgical procedure in which a chemical is injected into the vein, causing the vein to close off.


WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: September 09, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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