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Total Incontinence - Topic Overview

Total incontinence is the continuous and total loss of urinary control.

One cause of total incontinence is neurogenic bladder, a neurological problem that prevents the bladder from emptying properly. Spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, and other disorders that affect nerve function can also lead to total incontinence. Total incontinence in women can also be caused by a vesicovaginal fistula, an abnormal connection between the urinary tract and the vagina.

Recommended Related to Urinary Incontinence/OAB

Tips to Help You Manage Urinary Incontinence

Millions of Americans, especially older women, men who had prostate surgery, and pregnant women, live with urinary incontinence. If you’re among them, you don’t just have to accept this condition.   “Incontinence is more common as people get older, but it should never be viewed as a normal part of aging,” says Tomas L. Griebling, MD, MPH, vice chair of the urology department at the University of Kansas. “It really is not normal. If we can find reasons why they are having problems, we can get them...

Read the Tips to Help You Manage Urinary Incontinence article > >

Treatment

Total incontinence is usually treated by using a thin tube (catheter) to empty the bladder regularly. This is called intermittent self-catheterization.

Absorbent products such as pads or disposable underwear are usually used when other methods of treating incontinence have failed or cannot be used. These methods don't treat the incontinence but may make it possible to manage the problem.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 11, 2012
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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