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The Truth About Fats

Not all fats are equal. Learn which ones actually boost your health!

Making the Switch continued...

"How bad trans fats are for you depends on how much you eat," says Kava. "Trans fats can raise your blood cholesterol as much as excess cholesterol (from the diet) can in some people."

To avoid trans fats, look on the nutrition label of packaged foods. They'll appear on the ingredients list as "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" vegetable oils. If you can, switch to products that don't use hydrogenated oils. The baked goods won't last quite as long in your pantry, but your body will benefit.

Now for the good news: There are some fatty snacks that actually boost your health!

Go Nuts

Nuts are the latest high-fat food to undergo a change in dietary reputation.

"It doesn't seem to matter what nuts you eat to get important benefits, as long as they don't have added oil and salt," says Kendall.

The latest pro-nut research is out of the Harvard School of Public Health. Researchers found that women who reported eating a half serving of peanut butter or a full serving of nuts five or more times a week showed as much as a 30% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And the findings go on.

Other nuts, including almonds, walnuts, and pecans, have been shown to have heart healthy benefits, including lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol. (Remember, walnuts are also a source of omega-3.)

Nuts to Avoid

There really aren't any unhealthy nuts, as long as you leave out the oil and salt. But it's important to remember that all nuts are high in calories.

"You can't just add them to your diet," says Kendall. "You really need to think about using them to replace empty calories. Think about them as excellent substitutes for junk food."

Bring on the Fish

For a while now, cold-water species of fish such as salmon, tuna, trout, striped bass, sardines, and herring have taken the spotlight as the best protein-rich food source because they are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids. Studies show that people who eat such fish two times a week have less heart disease, a reduced risk of cancer, and improvements in mental health, particularly in mood function.

But there's a caveat.

"I'm also concerned about the mercury that these species of fish can carry for pregnant women," says Kava. She recommends that pregnant women stay away from shark, swordfish, and king mackerel because these bigger species tend to present more of a risk.

If you're not pregnant but still concerned, Kava says small salmon species give the most benefit with the least exposure to mercury.

Animal Fat to Avoid

We've long been told to eat less red meat, but new long-term studies of how eating habits affect actual health measures do not bear out many of the popular myths.

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