Skip to content

Women's Health

Most Women Don't Understand Breast Cancer Risk

White women overestimated their odds while other groups underestimated, researcher found
Font Size
A
A
A

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Kathleen Doheny

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Most women do not have an accurate idea of their personal risk of breast cancer, according to a new survey that polled more than 9,000 women.

"Only 9.4 percent of the women surveyed were accurately able to tell you their lifetime breast cancer risk," said study researcher Dr. Jonathan Herman.

Four in 10 women had never discussed their personal breast cancer risk with a doctor, according to Herman, an obstetrician and gynecologist at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ Medical School in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

He is due to present his survey findings Sunday at an American Society of Clinical Oncology breast cancer meeting in San Francisco. The data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The research began in 2010 after Herman's daughter, Sarah, then 13, wanted to find out if her father's contention about women not understanding their breast cancer risk was true. Together, they surveyed 9,873 women, aged 35 to 70, who were having breast cancer screening at 21 mammography centers in New York.

The women estimated their own risk of developing breast cancer over the next five years and over their lifetime. The Hermans also obtained information about the women's ethnicity, health insurance, personal and family history of breast cancer, and any previous discussions with their doctors to assess breast cancer risk.

The researchers calculated each woman's actual risk, using information provided, then compared that to the risk the patient had estimated. If the woman's estimate differed from the calculated risk by more than 10 percent, it was termed inaccurate.

In all, just 9.4 percent accurately estimated their risk, while nearly 45 percent underestimated and nearly 46 percent overestimated. White women were likely to overestimate, while black, Asian and Hispanic women were likely to underestimate, the findings showed.

Having an accurate risk estimate, Herman said, can help women decide what steps to take -- whether they may need closer screening or to go on chemoprevention with drugs such as tamoxifen that reduce breast cancer risk.

Today on WebMD

hands on abdomen
Test your knowledge.
womans hand on abdomen
Are you ready for baby?
 
birth control pills
Learn about your options.
insomnia
Is it menopause or something else?
 
woman in bathtub
Slideshow
Doctor discussing screening with patient
VIDEO
 
bp app on smartwatch and phone
Slideshow
iud
Expert views
 

Send yourself a link to download the app.

Loading ...

Please wait...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Blood pressure check
Slideshow
hot water bottle on stomach
Quiz
 
question
Assessment
Attractive young woman standing in front of mirror
Quiz