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  • Question 1/12

    One bad sunburn in childhood raises your skin cancer risk.

  • Answer 1/12

    One bad sunburn in childhood raises your skin cancer risk.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Kids are at high risk in the sun because it's easier for them to get sunburned. A baby's skin can burn in less than 10 minutes. Kids also tend to spend a lot of time outside and don't put sunscreen on themselves. Keep babies younger than 6 months out of the sun and protected by hats and clothes. Their thin skin is too young for sunscreen.

  • Question 1/12

    People with darker skin can't get sunburns or skin cancer.

  • Answer 1/12

    People with darker skin can't get sunburns or skin cancer.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Everybody can burn. People of color are often diagnosed with skin cancer at later stages because of a myth that only those with lighter skin can develop it.

  • Question 1/12

    Skin cancer only grows on places that have been exposed to the sun.

  • Answer 1/12

    Skin cancer only grows on places that have been exposed to the sun.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Skin cancers can grow anywhere on the body. There is a strong link between sun exposure and the two most common non-melanoma skin cancers, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These mostly grow on the face, ears, and hands.

  • Question 1/12

    What's so bad about indoor tanning early in life?

  • Answer 1/12

    What's so bad about indoor tanning early in life?

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    • Correct Answer:

    The risk of melanoma is a huge 75% higher in people who started to use tanning beds before age 25. Tanning salons use both UVA and UVB rays -- the same as the sun.

     

    Any kind of tan is damaged skin. That speeds skin aging, as well as raising the risk of cancer.

  • Question 1/12

    A base tan can help protect your skin from the sun.

  • Answer 1/12

    A base tan can help protect your skin from the sun.

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    • Correct Answer:

    There's no such thing as a safe tan. If you spend any time in the sun, you expose your skin to damaging UV rays. Tanned skin is damaged skin. It raises your risk for skin cancer and speeds up your skin's aging process.

  • Question 1/12

    Makeup can help protect your skin from the sun.

  • Answer 1/12

    Makeup can help protect your skin from the sun.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Look for moisturizers, eye creams, foundations, and lipsticks that have SPF. Powder can help keep them in place. Skip shiny, high-gloss lipsticks, which can attract UV rays to your lips. If you want the wet look, apply a colored lipstick first, and then top with gloss.

  • Question 1/12

    Window glass protects your skin from all harmful UV rays.

  • Answer 1/12

    Window glass protects your skin from all harmful UV rays.

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    • Correct Answer:

    UVB rays can’t get through glass, but UVA rays can. That's why you should use a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 every day, even when you’re going to be inside.

  • Question 1/12

    Which offers the best protection from the sun?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which offers the best protection from the sun?

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    • Correct Answer:

    While ball caps cover your head, where most skin cancers grow, they leave your cheeks, chin, and other areas exposed. Better: a hat with a brim at least 3 inches wide. It's best if the brim angles downward.

  • Question 1/12

    Dark clothes protect you from the sun better than light ones.

  • Answer 1/12

    Dark clothes protect you from the sun better than light ones.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    UV rays tend to pass through lighter-colored fabrics more easily. To block the most, wear deep blue and black or bright solids like orange and red. Tight weaves offer more protection than loose ones. If you can see light through the fabric when you hold it up, the sun's damaging rays can hit your skin. Some clothes have UPF (UV protection factor) ratings; the higher the better.

  • Question 1/12

    Dark sunglasses block more UV rays than light lenses.

  • Answer 1/12

    Dark sunglasses block more UV rays than light lenses.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Both can do the job. Look for labels that say "Meets ANSI UV Requirements" or "UV absorption up to 400 nm."  That means the glasses will block 99% of UV rays, compared with about 70% for most cosmetic glasses.

     

    Sunglasses are key, because up to 1 in 10 skin cancers strike the eyelid area. Sun can also raise the risk of cataracts, macular degeneration, sunburn of the cornea (keratitis), and cancers of the eye.

  • Question 1/12

    Which drugs can make you burn more easily in the sun?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which drugs can make you burn more easily in the sun?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Like naproxen, other pain relievers can also make you more sun-sensitive. So can tricyclic antidepressants, sulfonylureas for diabetes, or tetracycline, sulfa drugs, and many other antibiotics. When you get a new prescription, ask your doctor if it can make you more sun-sensitive. And ask about any current drugs before you head on a sunny vacation.

  • Question 1/12

    Melanoma -- the most deadly skin cancer -- most often occurs where?

  • Answer 1/12

    Melanoma -- the most deadly skin cancer -- most often occurs where?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most skin cancers strike the most exposed parts of the body, such as the face, ears, neck, forearms, and hands. Melanoma is different. It's often seen on the upper back for men and the lower legs and upper back for women. That's why it's important to wear sunscreen all over your body.

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Sources | Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on August 01, 2017 Medically Reviewed on August 01, 2017

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on
August 01, 2017

IMAGE:

Ellen Denuto

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "How Do I Prevent Skin Cancer?" "Skin of Color," "Sunscreens."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer Prevention and Early Detection."

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Harvard Medical School): "True or False: Dark-skinned People Don't Need Sunscreen."

CDC: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Use of Indoor Tanning Devices by Adults – United States 2010." May 11, 2012.

Cleveland Clinic: "Melanoma (Pathophysiology)."

FDA: "FDA Sheds Light on Sunscreens," "Indoor Tanning: The Risks of Ultraviolet Rays."

Skin Cancer Foundation: "Facts about Sunburn and Skin Cancer," "If You Can See Sunlight, Seek the Shade," "Sunburn."

Sun Safety Alliance: "Sun Safety Tips," "The Facts About Getting Too Much Sun."

The Shade Foundation: "Prevention - Adult Sun Safety," "Prevention - Children."

The Skin Cancer Foundation: "For Your Eyes," "Sunscreens Explained," "Understanding UVA and UVB," "Common Medications May Increase Sun Sensitivity," "Sun Protection and Makeup."

World Health Organization, Int J Cancer, "The association of use of sunbeds with cutaneous malignant melanoma and other skin cancers: a systematic review." 2007.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.