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  • Answer 1/8

    Your voice sounds different to you on a recording because:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Shocked by the sound of your own voice when you hear a recording? Many of us are. That’s because when we speak, the sounds we make bounce around in our skulls. That vibrates our eardrums in a different way than when we listen to others.   

  • Question 1/8

    These teenagers get deeper voices:

  • Answer 1/8

    These teenagers get deeper voices:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It may not be as noticeable in girls as it is in boys, but it happens. During puberty, we all release hormones that make our vocal cords longer and thicker, which makes our voices deeper (think violin strings to cello strings).

  • Question 1/8

    Your voice may sound different after age 60 because of:

  • Answer 1/8

    Your voice may sound different after age 60 because of:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may not be able to project as well, and it can be quieter. It also may be shaky, and your pitch may change. Men’s voices generally get higher because their vocal cords get stiffer and thinner. Women’s get lower after menopause, probably because they have less estrogen and more testosterone.

  • Answer 1/8

    In general, men prefer women with voices:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This may be because a higher voice pitch in women can be a sign of health and youth. Women, on the other hand, tend to prefer men with lower voices, possibly because it signals a large body size. But they don’t like voices so low that they’re outside the normal range. A very deep voice may sound unnatural. It can be a sign of a damaged voice box.

  • Question 1/8

    It’s easier to recognize the voice of a friend you haven’t seen in years than a familiar radio host.

  • Answer 1/8

    It’s easier to recognize the voice of a friend you haven’t seen in years than a familiar radio host.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It may seem strange, but you use both the part of your brain that processes sound and the part that recognizes faces to place someone’s voice, even when that person is on the phone.

  • Question 1/8

    When you drink water, you “coat” your vocal cords, which keeps them moist and healthy.

  • Answer 1/8

    When you drink water, you “coat” your vocal cords, which keeps them moist and healthy.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Fluids keep your whole body hydrated, and that includes the tissues that make up your vocal cords. This happens when your body absorbs water through your intestines. To “coat” your vocal cords, water would have to go through your windpipe, and that would make you choke.  

  • Question 1/8

    When you lose your voice, it’s often treated with:

  • Answer 1/8

    When you lose your voice, it’s often treated with:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Laryngitis usually goes away on its own. It’s typically caused by a virus or by using your voice too much. These things inflame your larynx -- the “voice box” that contains your vocal cords -- and make you hoarse. See your doctor if it lasts more than 2 weeks, or if you cough up blood or have trouble breathing or swallowing. Those may be signs of a more serious condition, such as acid reflux or growths on your vocal cords.

  • Question 1/8

    Voice changes are a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease.

  • Answer 1/8

    Voice changes are a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This happens to about 90% of people who have the disease. It may get quieter, breathy, or hoarse. It may be caused by brain changes that make it more difficult to control your vocal cords. Some who have the disease speak more slowly, while others -- about 10% -- speak much more quickly.

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You raised your voice high, and now you can raise your arm in victory. Good job!

    Results:

    Not bad. You were mostly in the chorus of correct answers -- out of tune in only a few cases.

    Results:

    You have voiced your thoughts and come up a bit short. Better luck next time.

Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 09, 2018 Medically Reviewed on August 09, 2018

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
August 09, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Jon Riley / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

The American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery: “The Voice and Aging.”

Arizona State University School of Life Sciences: “Hey, I Know You!”

Mayo Clinic: “Laryngitis,” “Parkinson’s Disease.”

National Institutes of Health: “Preferences for Very Low and Very High Voice Pitch in Humans.”

Parkinson’s Disease Foundation: “Speech and Communication.”

PLOS: “Implicit Multisensory Associations Influence Voice Recognition.”

University of Iowa Voice Academy: “How age changes your voice.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.