Understanding Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma -- Symptoms

Symptoms of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Symptoms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include:

  • Painless swelling of one or more lymph nodes, with no recent infection. Swelling may be intermittent.
  • Swelling, fluid accumulation, or pain in the abdomen.
  • Shortness of breath, wheezing, or coughing.
  • Bloody stool or vomit.
  • Swelling of the face, neck, and arms.
  • Blockage of urine flow.
  • Bone pain.
  • Unexplained weight loss amounting to 10% of body weight over six months.
  • Fever lasting for at least 14 consecutive days, usually in the late afternoon and early evening, and rarely above 102 degrees.
  • Headache.
  • Seizures.
  • Visual problems.
  • Mental status changes.
  • Numbness on areas of the face.
  • Balance problems.
  • Night sweats and chills lasting at least 14 consecutive days.
  • Severe itching of the skin.
  • Fatigue.
  • Weakness.

The symptoms of fever, heavy night sweats, and weight loss are known as "B" symptoms. They are most often associated with more aggressive disease.

Call Your Doctor If:

  • You notice a swollen, painless lymph node.
  • You have unexplained abdominal pain or swelling.
  • You develop an unexplained cough, shortness of breath, or wheezing.
  • You develop swelling of the face, neck, or arms.
  • You have unintended weight loss, fever, severe fatigue, or soaking night sweats lasting more than two weeks.
  • You have unexplainable, severe itching of your skin.
  • You have changes in mental activity.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD on July 19, 2017

Sources

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Learn About Cancer: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma."

National Cancer Institute: "Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma."

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