PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

When is the best time to get the flu shot?

ANSWER

Flu season can begin as early as September and last as late as May. Your best bet is to get a flu shot early in the season so your body has a chance to build up immunity to the virus. It takes about two weeks for the flu shot to protect you. If you don't get it early, getting a flu shot later still helps.

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Flu -- Get the Shot."

American Lung Association: "Influenza Fact Sheet."

FDA: "Influenza: Vaccination Still the Best Protection."

Mayo Clinic: "Flu Shot: Your best shot for avoiding influenza."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "NIAID Study Finds Higher Dose of Flu Vaccine Improves Immune Response in the Elderly."

Medline Plus: "Flu."

CDC web site: "Questions and Answers: Swine Flu and You," "Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu)," "Interim Guidance for Swine influenza A (H1N1): Taking Care of a Sick Person in Your Home."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 7, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Flu -- Get the Shot."

American Lung Association: "Influenza Fact Sheet."

FDA: "Influenza: Vaccination Still the Best Protection."

Mayo Clinic: "Flu Shot: Your best shot for avoiding influenza."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "NIAID Study Finds Higher Dose of Flu Vaccine Improves Immune Response in the Elderly."

Medline Plus: "Flu."

CDC web site: "Questions and Answers: Swine Flu and You," "Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu)," "Interim Guidance for Swine influenza A (H1N1): Taking Care of a Sick Person in Your Home."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 7, 2018

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: