0 0
  • Question 1/10

    Erectile dysfunction is a normal part of getting older.

  • Answer 1/10

    Erectile dysfunction is a normal part of getting older.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    ED happens to older men most often. Still, aging doesn't cause it. Growing older doesn't mean giving up sex, either. Men even in their 90s can be sexually active.

    Erectile dysfunction happens to a lot of guys. Half of American men older than 50 have reported at least some trouble being ready for sex. That doesn't mean they all have ED.

  • Question 1/10

    If you wake up with an erection, it means you don't have ED.

  • Answer 1/10

    If you wake up with an erection, it means you don't have ED.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can still get erections in your sleep if you have ED. It usually means your condition is caused by stress, depression, or something like that. If you don't get them in your sleep, it's likely your ED has a physical cause.

  • Question 1/10

    A common cause of ED is:

  • Answer 1/10

    A common cause of ED is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Tobacco and other drugs can hamper an erection. This is especially true if you've done either for a long time. A few glasses of wine might put you in the mood, but drinking too much too often can really put the fire out. It also helps to exercise, eat right, and manage stress.

  • Question 1/10

    Anytime you have a problem getting or keeping an erection, it's considered ED.

  • Answer 1/10

    Anytime you have a problem getting or keeping an erection, it's considered ED.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Lots of things can make it tough to get an erection. It's normal for that to happen once in a while. See your doctor, though, if it's a regular problem. They'll help you figure out the cause and give you treatment options.

  • Question 1/10

    ED can mean you are more likely to have:

  • Answer 1/10

    ED can mean you are more likely to have:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A narrowing and hardening of your arteries, the same things that cause heart attacks and some strokes, can curb blood supply to the penis. Of course, ED doesn't always mean you have a serious health issue, but check with your doctor to make sure.

  • Question 1/10

    ED can be a common side effect of:

  • Answer 1/10

    ED can be a common side effect of:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nearly all men who have radiation or surgery for prostate cancer will get ED, at least for a while. The delicate nerves that run along the prostate control your erections, and anything done near them could affect your sex life. But it's often temporary.

  • Question 1/10

    Why do men with diabetes have a higher risk of ED?

  • Answer 1/10

    Why do men with diabetes have a higher risk of ED?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Diabetes can damage blood vessels and nerves, which can cause ED and other problems. If you have diabetes, make sure to exercise. You'll also want to keep your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol in check to lower your odds.

  • Question 1/10

    Blood pressure medicine can cause ED.

  • Answer 1/10

    Blood pressure medicine can cause ED.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Lots of medicines can be triggers. The list includes blood pressure and heart drugs, antidepressants, and tranquilizers. They can have an impact on hormones, nerves, or blood flow. All of those things affect your ability to be ready for sex. If you're on a new prescription and you think it's causing a problem, don't stop taking it. But do call your doctor. They might prescribe something else.

  • Question 1/10

    Pills for ED make it tough to control erections

  • Answer 1/10

    Pills for ED make it tough to control erections

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you take pills for it, don't worry about getting erections at awkward times. These drugs work only if you're aroused. They generally help 7 out of 10 men get erections and, no doubt, confidence in the bedroom.

  • Question 1/10

    Men have been getting treatment for ED for more than a century.

  • Answer 1/10

    Men have been getting treatment for ED for more than a century.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Pumps were one of the earliest devices used to treat the condition. You can get modern-day pumps by prescription. If nothing else works, penile implant surgery may be a last resort. Your doctor can tell you about all your options.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Well done! You know a lot about ED.

    Results:

    Pretty good! YOu know the facts about ED.

    Results:

    You may want a do-over. Read up and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala, DO on November 09, 2019 Medically Reviewed on November 09, 2019

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala, DO on
November 09, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Odilon Dimier / PhotoAlto Agency RF Collections

SOURCES:

American Urological Association Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction: Secondary Treatment Options."

Cleveland Clinic: "Erectile Dysfunction: Overview," "Erectile Dysfunction and Lifestyle Changes: Diet and Exercise," "Medications That May Cause Erectile Dysfunction," "Sexual Dysfunction and Disease," "Surgical Penile Implants," "Treating Erectile Dysfunction: Lifestyle Changes," "Vacuum Constriction Devices."

Western Journal of Medicine: "Aging and Sexuality."

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Living with Prostate Cancer: Erectile Dysfunction," "Prostatectomy (Surgery.)"

Schwartz, B. Circulation,2011.

The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide: "Heart Disease and Erectile Dysfunction."

The Merck Manual: "Erectile Dysfunction."

Urology Care Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction," "Erectile Dysfunction: Causes, Risks & Talking to Your Doctor," "Erectile Dysfunction: Primary Treatment Options," "Non-surgical Management of Erectile Dysfunction," "Surgical Management of Erectile Dysfunction," "Treating Erectile Dysfunction: Medical Options."

Weill Cornell Medical College: "Evaluation of the Patient with Erectile Dysfunction," "Vacuum Devices for Erectile Dysfunction."

Wexner Medical Center: "Erectile Dysfunction/Impotence."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.