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  • Question 1/9

    Stress damages your heart because of:

  • Answer 1/9

    Stress damages your heart because of:

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    Stress can affect your physical health. But scientists are still trying to understand exactly how it impacts the heart. One thing is clear: some of the ways people choose to deal with stress -- smoking, drinking a lot of alcohol, or overeating -- are bad for your ticker. You probably can’t keep yourself from ever feeling under pressure, but you can find healthy ways to keep it from building up over time.

  • Question 1/9

    The link between emotional stress and heart health may lie in your:

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    The link between emotional stress and heart health may lie in your:

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    Stress boosts the activity of a small part of the brain called the amygdala. One study found that a more active amygdala signals bone marrow to make more white blood cells. That leads to a process called inflammation, which affects many parts of the body, including blood vessels. It can cause plaque to build up in arteries, which leads to heart attacks. Scientists need to do more research on the link between stress and heart disease, but this could be one part of the connection.

  • Question 1/9

    Which is the main stress hormone?

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    Which is the main stress hormone?

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    When you’re under pressure, your brain sets off an internal alarm system. It triggers your adrenal glands on top of your kidneys to release several hormones, including cortisol. This hormone boosts blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar. When you feel stressed out for a long time, cortisol levels stay high, and the changes it causes can put you at risk for heart disease.

  • Question 1/9

    Comfort foods help your heart because they ease stress.

  • Answer 1/9

    Comfort foods help your heart because they ease stress.

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    You might turn to ice cream or pizza when you’re stressed out. If fatty, high-cholesterol foods become your go-to way to relax, you could damage your heart health. Instead of leaning on food, find healthy ways to control your stress. You can try listening to music, laughing with a friend, or a few minutes of yoga.

  • Question 1/9

    Stress tires you out, so you sleep better.

  • Answer 1/9

    Stress tires you out, so you sleep better.

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    You’re more likely to have trouble sleeping when your stress levels climb. A sleepless night here or there won’t have too many lasting effects. But when you routinely miss out on rest, you’re adding more strain to your heart. People who often sleep less than 7 hours a night report having more health problems, like high blood pressure, that can lead to heart disease. If stress keeps you up at night, see if you can figure out the source of your worry and how to get it under control.

  • Answer 1/9

    When it comes to stress, exercise:

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    When you move, your body releases chemicals called endorphins that help boost your mood. Exercise also lowers blood pressure and strengthens your heart, protecting against heart disease.

  • Question 1/9

    Women with stressful jobs have a ___ higher risk of heart disease.

  • Answer 1/9

    Women with stressful jobs have a ___ higher risk of heart disease.

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    When work is consistently too stressful, it dials up your risk of heart trouble. You may not have too much control over the pace or culture of your job, so it’s important to find ways to ease stress when you’re there. Try taking walks during breaks, practicing meditation or deep breathing, or finding a friend or colleague you can talk to.

  • Question 1/9

    A broken heart can damage your real heart.

  • Answer 1/9

    A broken heart can damage your real heart.

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    Broken heart syndrome is real and can happen even if you’re healthy. When something very stressful happens -- like divorce, death, or even winning the lottery -- you can feel really bad chest pain. It can seem like a heart attack, even though there are no blocked arteries. Good news: The short-term heart failure is treatable and people usually make a full recovery.

  • Question 1/9

    What’s a key part of recovery after a heart attack?

  • Answer 1/9

    What’s a key part of recovery after a heart attack?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Take care of all parts of your life after a heart attack. Eat healthy foods and get plenty of exercise. Also make sure you find heart-friendly ways to relax when you’re under pressure -- whether it’s through exercise, meditation, or a hobby you enjoy.

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Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 07, 2021 Medically Reviewed on January 07, 2021

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
January 07, 2021

1) (Left to right)  AJPhoto / Science Source, janulla / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Stress & Heart Disease.”

 

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “The Connection Between Heart Health and Stress.”

 

Harvard Medical School: “Stress and your heart,” “Women, work, stress, and heart disease: 5 ways to protect yourself,” “Uncovering the link between emotional stress and heart disease,” “Reduce your stress to protect your heart.”

 

British Heart Foundation: “Feeling stressed? Research shows how stress can lead to heart attacks and stroke.”

 

Mayo Clinic: “Chronic stress puts your health at risk.”

 

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Stress Can Increase Your Risk for Heart Disease.”

 

PLoS One: “Job strain, job insecurity, and incident cardiovascular disease in the Women's Health Study: results from a 10-year prospective study.”

 

American Heart Association: “Stress and Heart Health,” “Is Broken Heart Syndrome Real?”

 

FamilyDoctor.org: “Tips for Recovering and Staying Well After a Heart Attack.”

 

CDC: “How Does Sleep Affect Your Heart Health?”

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