Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD)

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD)

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A doctor places an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (also called an ICD) in the chest. The ICD has one or two wires called leads that connect to the heart through the subclavian vein. The ICD checks the heartbeat for an abnormal rhythm. If the ICD senses an abnormal heart rhythm, it sends out either electrical pulses or a shock to fix it.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerRakesh K. Pai, MD, FACC - Cardiology, Electrophysiology
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerStephen Fort, MD, MRCP, FRCPC - Interventional Cardiology
Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine

Current as ofOctober 1, 2015

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise
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