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  • Question 1/8

    Blood thinners make your blood less thick.

  • Answer 1/8

    Blood thinners make your blood less thick.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications don't actually thin the blood. But they do make it harder for it to clot, which helps prevent heart attacks and strokes. Discuss bleeding risks with your doctor before you take blood thinners.

  • Question 1/8

    You shouldn't eat spinach if you take a blood thinner.

  • Answer 1/8

    You shouldn't eat spinach if you take a blood thinner.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your doctor may change your dose of the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) depending on the amount of dark, green leafy vegetables you eat. Talk to your doctor about how much of these you should eat, and then eat a consistent amount. The drug Plavix doesn't need any dosing changes, even if you eat a lot of spinach.

     

     

  • Question 1/8

    What could be a sign of bleeding?

  • Answer 1/8

    What could be a sign of bleeding?

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    • Correct Answer:

    The most common side effect of blood thinners is bleeding you can't control. That could be a cut that won't stop, pee that's red or brown, or bowel movements that are red or look like tar. Other signs are bruises you don't know how you got or a very bad headache. Call your doctor if you notice any of these.

     

    Go to the hospital or call your doctor if you have a bad fall or a hard bump, even if you don't see any blood.

  • Question 1/8

    Which common drug can help prevent blood clots?

  • Answer 1/8

    Which common drug can help prevent blood clots?

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    • Correct Answer:

    You need a prescription for blood thinners. But if you have or are at risk for heart problems, this over-the-counter drug could save your life. Check with your doctor before you use it, though, and follow his advice on how much to take and when.

  • Question 1/8

    When you're taking a blood thinner, which of these is least risky?

  • Answer 1/8

    When you're taking a blood thinner, which of these is least risky?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You want to avoid anything that could make you bleed. Some things are obvious: Be careful when you use sharp things such as knives, scissors, and razors.

     

    Others you may need to think about: To keep your gums from bleeding, try a soft toothbrush and waxed dental floss. Don't use toothpicks. Always wear shoes outdoors. Put on gloves while gardening and using tools.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you forget to take your blood thinner, it's best to:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Some blood thinners need to be taken around the same time every day. If you forget to take yours, do it when you remember. Then take your next day's dose on your regular schedule. A pill box with slots for different days can help you stay on track. Call your doctor if you miss a day.

  • Question 1/8

    Which is the safest sport for someone taking blood thinners?

  • Answer 1/8

    Which is the safest sport for someone taking blood thinners?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Non-contact sports like swimming are generally safe because you're not likely to bruise or bleed. If you want to do something with more impact or a chance of getting hit, check with your doctor. Also ask if you should wear a medical alert bracelet that lists the drugs you take.

  • Question 1/8

    What should you do if you get a nosebleed?

  • Answer 1/8

    What should you do if you get a nosebleed?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nosebleeds are more common when you're on blood thinners, and you might have trouble making them stop. Gently pinch your upper nose just below the bony ridge for 10 to 15 minutes, and put a cold compress on the bridge. Don't look upward or lie down. Call your doctor if your nosebleed lasts a long time. Talk to your doctor if it happens a lot.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on July 03, 2018 Medically Reviewed on July 03, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
July 03, 2018

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Blood Thinner Pills: Your Guide to Using Them Safely," "Cardiovascular Disease Potential High-Impact Interventions Report."

American Heart Association: "What are Anticoagulants and Antiplatelets?"

Intermountain Healthcare: "Coumadin (warfarin) Anticoagulation Therapy."

Medline Plus: "Blood thinners."

National Jewish Health: "Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug Interaction."

Clinical Center Drug-Nutrient Interaction Task Force: "Important Information to Know When You Are Taking Warfarin (Coumadin) and Vitamin K."

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: "Prevent Bleeding When Taking Blood Thinners."

Spliner, S. Circulation ,2011.

Texas Heart Institute: "Anticoagulants."

Uptodate.com: "Nosebleed overview."

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